Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours!

Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 

We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 

Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).

May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours!

Last week we had a donation of 80 native plants … locally grown from Orange County seed, courtesy of the Irvine Ranch Conservancy. Thanks to a dedicated bunch of volunteers (including my grandsons), we got all the plants in the ground Sunday afternoon. Although this is not the optimal time to plant natives, we’re glad to have this chance to experiment, and look forward to following the progress of the seedlings (some of which were planted in cleared ground, and some of which were stuck in the midst of a thick layer of invasive black mustard stalks).

One of our volunteers was an old family friend (and professional photographer), visiting Orange County for a bit. She graciously put together our first Heritage Garden video …  Thank you, Sarah Porisch Crowder!

Five hundred feet of drip tubing! Thanks to “Mr. Heritage Garden” (the handy Steve Gavin) it is now going to be a lot easier to water all the thriving veggies (and fruits: we have watermelon and blackberries on their way!).
Student Kimmie O. stopped by to say “hi” … asked “is there anything I can do to help” … and next thing you know, she is hauling wheelbarrow loads of recycled campus trees to make paths between the garden beds (and cover the drip tubing to keep folks from tripping on it).
Thanks Kimmie! Stop by any time! 
Other visitors today: Dr. David Loy, Assistant Prof. of Philosophy, Theology, and Ethics. He stopped by on his way from the parking lot to Beta; we chatted about many things, including garden-related philosophy and theology. He suggested an outdoor food prep area … where we could learn to can/preserve tomatoes (and other garden bounty). Yes! That will definitely go on our “garden wish list” as we work on a long-term plan for the Heritage Garden. 
And what a nice surprise to have Cecilia and Kevin from our food services company stop by with great ideas about composting cafeteria “trimmings” … and maybe even an “Eat Local” day during the fall semester …  when the caf will feature Heritage Garden produce. 
Lots to look forward to! In the meantime … if you need kale … the Heritage Garden has it. Five hundred feet of drip tubing! Thanks to “Mr. Heritage Garden” (the handy Steve Gavin) it is now going to be a lot easier to water all the thriving veggies (and fruits: we have watermelon and blackberries on their way!).
Student Kimmie O. stopped by to say “hi” … asked “is there anything I can do to help” … and next thing you know, she is hauling wheelbarrow loads of recycled campus trees to make paths between the garden beds (and cover the drip tubing to keep folks from tripping on it).
Thanks Kimmie! Stop by any time! 
Other visitors today: Dr. David Loy, Assistant Prof. of Philosophy, Theology, and Ethics. He stopped by on his way from the parking lot to Beta; we chatted about many things, including garden-related philosophy and theology. He suggested an outdoor food prep area … where we could learn to can/preserve tomatoes (and other garden bounty). Yes! That will definitely go on our “garden wish list” as we work on a long-term plan for the Heritage Garden. 
And what a nice surprise to have Cecilia and Kevin from our food services company stop by with great ideas about composting cafeteria “trimmings” … and maybe even an “Eat Local” day during the fall semester …  when the caf will feature Heritage Garden produce. 
Lots to look forward to! In the meantime … if you need kale … the Heritage Garden has it. Five hundred feet of drip tubing! Thanks to “Mr. Heritage Garden” (the handy Steve Gavin) it is now going to be a lot easier to water all the thriving veggies (and fruits: we have watermelon and blackberries on their way!).
Student Kimmie O. stopped by to say “hi” … asked “is there anything I can do to help” … and next thing you know, she is hauling wheelbarrow loads of recycled campus trees to make paths between the garden beds (and cover the drip tubing to keep folks from tripping on it).
Thanks Kimmie! Stop by any time! 
Other visitors today: Dr. David Loy, Assistant Prof. of Philosophy, Theology, and Ethics. He stopped by on his way from the parking lot to Beta; we chatted about many things, including garden-related philosophy and theology. He suggested an outdoor food prep area … where we could learn to can/preserve tomatoes (and other garden bounty). Yes! That will definitely go on our “garden wish list” as we work on a long-term plan for the Heritage Garden. 
And what a nice surprise to have Cecilia and Kevin from our food services company stop by with great ideas about composting cafeteria “trimmings” … and maybe even an “Eat Local” day during the fall semester …  when the caf will feature Heritage Garden produce. 
Lots to look forward to! In the meantime … if you need kale … the Heritage Garden has it. Five hundred feet of drip tubing! Thanks to “Mr. Heritage Garden” (the handy Steve Gavin) it is now going to be a lot easier to water all the thriving veggies (and fruits: we have watermelon and blackberries on their way!).
Student Kimmie O. stopped by to say “hi” … asked “is there anything I can do to help” … and next thing you know, she is hauling wheelbarrow loads of recycled campus trees to make paths between the garden beds (and cover the drip tubing to keep folks from tripping on it).
Thanks Kimmie! Stop by any time! 
Other visitors today: Dr. David Loy, Assistant Prof. of Philosophy, Theology, and Ethics. He stopped by on his way from the parking lot to Beta; we chatted about many things, including garden-related philosophy and theology. He suggested an outdoor food prep area … where we could learn to can/preserve tomatoes (and other garden bounty). Yes! That will definitely go on our “garden wish list” as we work on a long-term plan for the Heritage Garden. 
And what a nice surprise to have Cecilia and Kevin from our food services company stop by with great ideas about composting cafeteria “trimmings” … and maybe even an “Eat Local” day during the fall semester …  when the caf will feature Heritage Garden produce. 
Lots to look forward to! In the meantime … if you need kale … the Heritage Garden has it. Five hundred feet of drip tubing! Thanks to “Mr. Heritage Garden” (the handy Steve Gavin) it is now going to be a lot easier to water all the thriving veggies (and fruits: we have watermelon and blackberries on their way!).
Student Kimmie O. stopped by to say “hi” … asked “is there anything I can do to help” … and next thing you know, she is hauling wheelbarrow loads of recycled campus trees to make paths between the garden beds (and cover the drip tubing to keep folks from tripping on it).
Thanks Kimmie! Stop by any time! 
Other visitors today: Dr. David Loy, Assistant Prof. of Philosophy, Theology, and Ethics. He stopped by on his way from the parking lot to Beta; we chatted about many things, including garden-related philosophy and theology. He suggested an outdoor food prep area … where we could learn to can/preserve tomatoes (and other garden bounty). Yes! That will definitely go on our “garden wish list” as we work on a long-term plan for the Heritage Garden. 
And what a nice surprise to have Cecilia and Kevin from our food services company stop by with great ideas about composting cafeteria “trimmings” … and maybe even an “Eat Local” day during the fall semester …  when the caf will feature Heritage Garden produce. 
Lots to look forward to! In the meantime … if you need kale … the Heritage Garden has it. Five hundred feet of drip tubing! Thanks to “Mr. Heritage Garden” (the handy Steve Gavin) it is now going to be a lot easier to water all the thriving veggies (and fruits: we have watermelon and blackberries on their way!).
Student Kimmie O. stopped by to say “hi” … asked “is there anything I can do to help” … and next thing you know, she is hauling wheelbarrow loads of recycled campus trees to make paths between the garden beds (and cover the drip tubing to keep folks from tripping on it).
Thanks Kimmie! Stop by any time! 
Other visitors today: Dr. David Loy, Assistant Prof. of Philosophy, Theology, and Ethics. He stopped by on his way from the parking lot to Beta; we chatted about many things, including garden-related philosophy and theology. He suggested an outdoor food prep area … where we could learn to can/preserve tomatoes (and other garden bounty). Yes! That will definitely go on our “garden wish list” as we work on a long-term plan for the Heritage Garden. 
And what a nice surprise to have Cecilia and Kevin from our food services company stop by with great ideas about composting cafeteria “trimmings” … and maybe even an “Eat Local” day during the fall semester …  when the caf will feature Heritage Garden produce. 
Lots to look forward to! In the meantime … if you need kale … the Heritage Garden has it. Five hundred feet of drip tubing! Thanks to “Mr. Heritage Garden” (the handy Steve Gavin) it is now going to be a lot easier to water all the thriving veggies (and fruits: we have watermelon and blackberries on their way!).
Student Kimmie O. stopped by to say “hi” … asked “is there anything I can do to help” … and next thing you know, she is hauling wheelbarrow loads of recycled campus trees to make paths between the garden beds (and cover the drip tubing to keep folks from tripping on it).
Thanks Kimmie! Stop by any time! 
Other visitors today: Dr. David Loy, Assistant Prof. of Philosophy, Theology, and Ethics. He stopped by on his way from the parking lot to Beta; we chatted about many things, including garden-related philosophy and theology. He suggested an outdoor food prep area … where we could learn to can/preserve tomatoes (and other garden bounty). Yes! That will definitely go on our “garden wish list” as we work on a long-term plan for the Heritage Garden. 
And what a nice surprise to have Cecilia and Kevin from our food services company stop by with great ideas about composting cafeteria “trimmings” … and maybe even an “Eat Local” day during the fall semester …  when the caf will feature Heritage Garden produce. 
Lots to look forward to! In the meantime … if you need kale … the Heritage Garden has it. Five hundred feet of drip tubing! Thanks to “Mr. Heritage Garden” (the handy Steve Gavin) it is now going to be a lot easier to water all the thriving veggies (and fruits: we have watermelon and blackberries on their way!).
Student Kimmie O. stopped by to say “hi” … asked “is there anything I can do to help” … and next thing you know, she is hauling wheelbarrow loads of recycled campus trees to make paths between the garden beds (and cover the drip tubing to keep folks from tripping on it).
Thanks Kimmie! Stop by any time! 
Other visitors today: Dr. David Loy, Assistant Prof. of Philosophy, Theology, and Ethics. He stopped by on his way from the parking lot to Beta; we chatted about many things, including garden-related philosophy and theology. He suggested an outdoor food prep area … where we could learn to can/preserve tomatoes (and other garden bounty). Yes! That will definitely go on our “garden wish list” as we work on a long-term plan for the Heritage Garden. 
And what a nice surprise to have Cecilia and Kevin from our food services company stop by with great ideas about composting cafeteria “trimmings” … and maybe even an “Eat Local” day during the fall semester …  when the caf will feature Heritage Garden produce. 
Lots to look forward to! In the meantime … if you need kale … the Heritage Garden has it. Five hundred feet of drip tubing! Thanks to “Mr. Heritage Garden” (the handy Steve Gavin) it is now going to be a lot easier to water all the thriving veggies (and fruits: we have watermelon and blackberries on their way!).
Student Kimmie O. stopped by to say “hi” … asked “is there anything I can do to help” … and next thing you know, she is hauling wheelbarrow loads of recycled campus trees to make paths between the garden beds (and cover the drip tubing to keep folks from tripping on it).
Thanks Kimmie! Stop by any time! 
Other visitors today: Dr. David Loy, Assistant Prof. of Philosophy, Theology, and Ethics. He stopped by on his way from the parking lot to Beta; we chatted about many things, including garden-related philosophy and theology. He suggested an outdoor food prep area … where we could learn to can/preserve tomatoes (and other garden bounty). Yes! That will definitely go on our “garden wish list” as we work on a long-term plan for the Heritage Garden. 
And what a nice surprise to have Cecilia and Kevin from our food services company stop by with great ideas about composting cafeteria “trimmings” … and maybe even an “Eat Local” day during the fall semester …  when the caf will feature Heritage Garden produce. 
Lots to look forward to! In the meantime … if you need kale … the Heritage Garden has it.

Five hundred feet of drip tubing! Thanks to “Mr. Heritage Garden” (the handy Steve Gavin) it is now going to be a lot easier to water all the thriving veggies (and fruits: we have watermelon and blackberries on their way!).

Student Kimmie O. stopped by to say “hi” … asked “is there anything I can do to help” … and next thing you know, she is hauling wheelbarrow loads of recycled campus trees to make paths between the garden beds (and cover the drip tubing to keep folks from tripping on it).

Thanks Kimmie! Stop by any time! 

Other visitors today: Dr. David Loy, Assistant Prof. of Philosophy, Theology, and Ethics. He stopped by on his way from the parking lot to Beta; we chatted about many things, including garden-related philosophy and theology. He suggested an outdoor food prep area … where we could learn to can/preserve tomatoes (and other garden bounty). Yes! That will definitely go on our “garden wish list” as we work on a long-term plan for the Heritage Garden. 

And what a nice surprise to have Cecilia and Kevin from our food services company stop by with great ideas about composting cafeteria “trimmings” … and maybe even an “Eat Local” day during the fall semester …  when the caf will feature Heritage Garden produce. 

Lots to look forward to! In the meantime … if you need kale … the Heritage Garden has it.

What a great work day in the Heritage Garden today! We had super volunteers (from all categories: professor, student, staff family, alumni, community members) working hard for three warm and breezy May hours to spread mulch, move rocks, hand water, remove invasives, and plant plant plant some more fruits and veggies.
Thanks to all! The Garden is now ready for tomorrow afternoon’s Senior Fest tour. What a great work day in the Heritage Garden today! We had super volunteers (from all categories: professor, student, staff family, alumni, community members) working hard for three warm and breezy May hours to spread mulch, move rocks, hand water, remove invasives, and plant plant plant some more fruits and veggies.
Thanks to all! The Garden is now ready for tomorrow afternoon’s Senior Fest tour. What a great work day in the Heritage Garden today! We had super volunteers (from all categories: professor, student, staff family, alumni, community members) working hard for three warm and breezy May hours to spread mulch, move rocks, hand water, remove invasives, and plant plant plant some more fruits and veggies.
Thanks to all! The Garden is now ready for tomorrow afternoon’s Senior Fest tour. What a great work day in the Heritage Garden today! We had super volunteers (from all categories: professor, student, staff family, alumni, community members) working hard for three warm and breezy May hours to spread mulch, move rocks, hand water, remove invasives, and plant plant plant some more fruits and veggies.
Thanks to all! The Garden is now ready for tomorrow afternoon’s Senior Fest tour. What a great work day in the Heritage Garden today! We had super volunteers (from all categories: professor, student, staff family, alumni, community members) working hard for three warm and breezy May hours to spread mulch, move rocks, hand water, remove invasives, and plant plant plant some more fruits and veggies.
Thanks to all! The Garden is now ready for tomorrow afternoon’s Senior Fest tour. What a great work day in the Heritage Garden today! We had super volunteers (from all categories: professor, student, staff family, alumni, community members) working hard for three warm and breezy May hours to spread mulch, move rocks, hand water, remove invasives, and plant plant plant some more fruits and veggies.
Thanks to all! The Garden is now ready for tomorrow afternoon’s Senior Fest tour. What a great work day in the Heritage Garden today! We had super volunteers (from all categories: professor, student, staff family, alumni, community members) working hard for three warm and breezy May hours to spread mulch, move rocks, hand water, remove invasives, and plant plant plant some more fruits and veggies.
Thanks to all! The Garden is now ready for tomorrow afternoon’s Senior Fest tour. What a great work day in the Heritage Garden today! We had super volunteers (from all categories: professor, student, staff family, alumni, community members) working hard for three warm and breezy May hours to spread mulch, move rocks, hand water, remove invasives, and plant plant plant some more fruits and veggies.
Thanks to all! The Garden is now ready for tomorrow afternoon’s Senior Fest tour. What a great work day in the Heritage Garden today! We had super volunteers (from all categories: professor, student, staff family, alumni, community members) working hard for three warm and breezy May hours to spread mulch, move rocks, hand water, remove invasives, and plant plant plant some more fruits and veggies.
Thanks to all! The Garden is now ready for tomorrow afternoon’s Senior Fest tour. What a great work day in the Heritage Garden today! We had super volunteers (from all categories: professor, student, staff family, alumni, community members) working hard for three warm and breezy May hours to spread mulch, move rocks, hand water, remove invasives, and plant plant plant some more fruits and veggies.
Thanks to all! The Garden is now ready for tomorrow afternoon’s Senior Fest tour.

What a great work day in the Heritage Garden today! We had super volunteers (from all categories: professor, student, staff family, alumni, community members) working hard for three warm and breezy May hours to spread mulch, move rocks, hand water, remove invasives, and plant plant plant some more fruits and veggies.

Thanks to all! The Garden is now ready for tomorrow afternoon’s Senior Fest tour.

The semester just wound down, but the Heritage Garden is just getting into full growing mode.
The giant pumpkins (Big Max) have sprouted, zucchini is already big enough to harvest, the lettuce has been replaced by other veggies more suited for So Cal’s summer heat.
Soon to come: a watermelon-thon, with seeds of Moon & Stars, Crimson Sweet, and Black Diamond varieties ready to plant (Black Diamond: “fruits average 30-50 pounds, with some reaching up to 125 pounds.”)
Send me a note if you want to work in the garden this summer … there’s always lots to do, and we’re looking for “regulars” to pitch in with watering duties. (Nothing is more relaxing that watering the vegetable plots and listening to the native birds calling from the nearby willow.)
thea.gavin@cui.edu The semester just wound down, but the Heritage Garden is just getting into full growing mode.
The giant pumpkins (Big Max) have sprouted, zucchini is already big enough to harvest, the lettuce has been replaced by other veggies more suited for So Cal’s summer heat.
Soon to come: a watermelon-thon, with seeds of Moon & Stars, Crimson Sweet, and Black Diamond varieties ready to plant (Black Diamond: “fruits average 30-50 pounds, with some reaching up to 125 pounds.”)
Send me a note if you want to work in the garden this summer … there’s always lots to do, and we’re looking for “regulars” to pitch in with watering duties. (Nothing is more relaxing that watering the vegetable plots and listening to the native birds calling from the nearby willow.)
thea.gavin@cui.edu The semester just wound down, but the Heritage Garden is just getting into full growing mode.
The giant pumpkins (Big Max) have sprouted, zucchini is already big enough to harvest, the lettuce has been replaced by other veggies more suited for So Cal’s summer heat.
Soon to come: a watermelon-thon, with seeds of Moon & Stars, Crimson Sweet, and Black Diamond varieties ready to plant (Black Diamond: “fruits average 30-50 pounds, with some reaching up to 125 pounds.”)
Send me a note if you want to work in the garden this summer … there’s always lots to do, and we’re looking for “regulars” to pitch in with watering duties. (Nothing is more relaxing that watering the vegetable plots and listening to the native birds calling from the nearby willow.)
thea.gavin@cui.edu The semester just wound down, but the Heritage Garden is just getting into full growing mode.
The giant pumpkins (Big Max) have sprouted, zucchini is already big enough to harvest, the lettuce has been replaced by other veggies more suited for So Cal’s summer heat.
Soon to come: a watermelon-thon, with seeds of Moon & Stars, Crimson Sweet, and Black Diamond varieties ready to plant (Black Diamond: “fruits average 30-50 pounds, with some reaching up to 125 pounds.”)
Send me a note if you want to work in the garden this summer … there’s always lots to do, and we’re looking for “regulars” to pitch in with watering duties. (Nothing is more relaxing that watering the vegetable plots and listening to the native birds calling from the nearby willow.)
thea.gavin@cui.edu The semester just wound down, but the Heritage Garden is just getting into full growing mode.
The giant pumpkins (Big Max) have sprouted, zucchini is already big enough to harvest, the lettuce has been replaced by other veggies more suited for So Cal’s summer heat.
Soon to come: a watermelon-thon, with seeds of Moon & Stars, Crimson Sweet, and Black Diamond varieties ready to plant (Black Diamond: “fruits average 30-50 pounds, with some reaching up to 125 pounds.”)
Send me a note if you want to work in the garden this summer … there’s always lots to do, and we’re looking for “regulars” to pitch in with watering duties. (Nothing is more relaxing that watering the vegetable plots and listening to the native birds calling from the nearby willow.)
thea.gavin@cui.edu The semester just wound down, but the Heritage Garden is just getting into full growing mode.
The giant pumpkins (Big Max) have sprouted, zucchini is already big enough to harvest, the lettuce has been replaced by other veggies more suited for So Cal’s summer heat.
Soon to come: a watermelon-thon, with seeds of Moon & Stars, Crimson Sweet, and Black Diamond varieties ready to plant (Black Diamond: “fruits average 30-50 pounds, with some reaching up to 125 pounds.”)
Send me a note if you want to work in the garden this summer … there’s always lots to do, and we’re looking for “regulars” to pitch in with watering duties. (Nothing is more relaxing that watering the vegetable plots and listening to the native birds calling from the nearby willow.)
thea.gavin@cui.edu The semester just wound down, but the Heritage Garden is just getting into full growing mode.
The giant pumpkins (Big Max) have sprouted, zucchini is already big enough to harvest, the lettuce has been replaced by other veggies more suited for So Cal’s summer heat.
Soon to come: a watermelon-thon, with seeds of Moon & Stars, Crimson Sweet, and Black Diamond varieties ready to plant (Black Diamond: “fruits average 30-50 pounds, with some reaching up to 125 pounds.”)
Send me a note if you want to work in the garden this summer … there’s always lots to do, and we’re looking for “regulars” to pitch in with watering duties. (Nothing is more relaxing that watering the vegetable plots and listening to the native birds calling from the nearby willow.)
thea.gavin@cui.edu The semester just wound down, but the Heritage Garden is just getting into full growing mode.
The giant pumpkins (Big Max) have sprouted, zucchini is already big enough to harvest, the lettuce has been replaced by other veggies more suited for So Cal’s summer heat.
Soon to come: a watermelon-thon, with seeds of Moon & Stars, Crimson Sweet, and Black Diamond varieties ready to plant (Black Diamond: “fruits average 30-50 pounds, with some reaching up to 125 pounds.”)
Send me a note if you want to work in the garden this summer … there’s always lots to do, and we’re looking for “regulars” to pitch in with watering duties. (Nothing is more relaxing that watering the vegetable plots and listening to the native birds calling from the nearby willow.)
thea.gavin@cui.edu

The semester just wound down, but the Heritage Garden is just getting into full growing mode.

The giant pumpkins (Big Max) have sprouted, zucchini is already big enough to harvest, the lettuce has been replaced by other veggies more suited for So Cal’s summer heat.

Soon to come: a watermelon-thon, with seeds of Moon & Stars, Crimson Sweet, and Black Diamond varieties ready to plant (Black Diamond: “fruits average 30-50 pounds, with some reaching up to 125 pounds.”)

Send me a note if you want to work in the garden this summer … there’s always lots to do, and we’re looking for “regulars” to pitch in with watering duties. (Nothing is more relaxing that watering the vegetable plots and listening to the native birds calling from the nearby willow.)

thea.gavin@cui.edu

What a fun day yesterday, celebrating Earth Week at the Heritage Garden. Students, faculty, staff, and community members all helped pull and dig and plant … thanks all!
And a special shout-out to Cub Scout Pack 621 for their work getting rid of some nasty invasive non-native mustard, as well as their muddy efforts to plant our first California native coast live oak. Well done, boys!
Six hills of Big Max pumpkins have been planted … maybe we’ll have a guess-the-weight contest at summer’s end?
You can the results, above, of the Heritage Garden Club members work to make the new picnic table a thing of beauty, with help from art student Alexia. What a fun day yesterday, celebrating Earth Week at the Heritage Garden. Students, faculty, staff, and community members all helped pull and dig and plant … thanks all!
And a special shout-out to Cub Scout Pack 621 for their work getting rid of some nasty invasive non-native mustard, as well as their muddy efforts to plant our first California native coast live oak. Well done, boys!
Six hills of Big Max pumpkins have been planted … maybe we’ll have a guess-the-weight contest at summer’s end?
You can the results, above, of the Heritage Garden Club members work to make the new picnic table a thing of beauty, with help from art student Alexia. What a fun day yesterday, celebrating Earth Week at the Heritage Garden. Students, faculty, staff, and community members all helped pull and dig and plant … thanks all!
And a special shout-out to Cub Scout Pack 621 for their work getting rid of some nasty invasive non-native mustard, as well as their muddy efforts to plant our first California native coast live oak. Well done, boys!
Six hills of Big Max pumpkins have been planted … maybe we’ll have a guess-the-weight contest at summer’s end?
You can the results, above, of the Heritage Garden Club members work to make the new picnic table a thing of beauty, with help from art student Alexia. What a fun day yesterday, celebrating Earth Week at the Heritage Garden. Students, faculty, staff, and community members all helped pull and dig and plant … thanks all!
And a special shout-out to Cub Scout Pack 621 for their work getting rid of some nasty invasive non-native mustard, as well as their muddy efforts to plant our first California native coast live oak. Well done, boys!
Six hills of Big Max pumpkins have been planted … maybe we’ll have a guess-the-weight contest at summer’s end?
You can the results, above, of the Heritage Garden Club members work to make the new picnic table a thing of beauty, with help from art student Alexia. What a fun day yesterday, celebrating Earth Week at the Heritage Garden. Students, faculty, staff, and community members all helped pull and dig and plant … thanks all!
And a special shout-out to Cub Scout Pack 621 for their work getting rid of some nasty invasive non-native mustard, as well as their muddy efforts to plant our first California native coast live oak. Well done, boys!
Six hills of Big Max pumpkins have been planted … maybe we’ll have a guess-the-weight contest at summer’s end?
You can the results, above, of the Heritage Garden Club members work to make the new picnic table a thing of beauty, with help from art student Alexia.

What a fun day yesterday, celebrating Earth Week at the Heritage Garden. Students, faculty, staff, and community members all helped pull and dig and plant … thanks all!

And a special shout-out to Cub Scout Pack 621 for their work getting rid of some nasty invasive non-native mustard, as well as their muddy efforts to plant our first California native coast live oak. Well done, boys!

Six hills of Big Max pumpkins have been planted … maybe we’ll have a guess-the-weight contest at summer’s end?

You can the results, above, of the Heritage Garden Club members work to make the new picnic table a thing of beauty, with help from art student Alexia.

Celebrate Earth Week at the Heritage Garden!

It’s spring …  Time to get growing … thanks to all the recent volunteers at the Heritage Garden. We now have a new bed of culinary herbs … come by for some aromatherapy. It’s spring …  Time to get growing … thanks to all the recent volunteers at the Heritage Garden. We now have a new bed of culinary herbs … come by for some aromatherapy. It’s spring …  Time to get growing … thanks to all the recent volunteers at the Heritage Garden. We now have a new bed of culinary herbs … come by for some aromatherapy. It’s spring …  Time to get growing … thanks to all the recent volunteers at the Heritage Garden. We now have a new bed of culinary herbs … come by for some aromatherapy. It’s spring …  Time to get growing … thanks to all the recent volunteers at the Heritage Garden. We now have a new bed of culinary herbs … come by for some aromatherapy. It’s spring …  Time to get growing … thanks to all the recent volunteers at the Heritage Garden. We now have a new bed of culinary herbs … come by for some aromatherapy. It’s spring …  Time to get growing … thanks to all the recent volunteers at the Heritage Garden. We now have a new bed of culinary herbs … come by for some aromatherapy. It’s spring …  Time to get growing … thanks to all the recent volunteers at the Heritage Garden. We now have a new bed of culinary herbs … come by for some aromatherapy.

It’s spring …  Time to get growing … thanks to all the recent volunteers at the Heritage Garden. We now have a new bed of culinary herbs … come by for some aromatherapy.

There’s lettuce already planted, and hope for spinach. We’re using a layer of hay for mulch: this keeps the soil temperature even and saves water by reducing evaporation. 
In the center of the garden—next to the purple bench that my mom painted years ago—is a circle of native plants that were donated by the Irvine Ranch Conservancy. These were grown from seed harvested from our Orange County wildlands, and we are grateful for such a wonderful gift. 
The white pipe sticking up is one of our “worm tubes” — an eight-inch plastic pipe with holes drilled in the sides and filled with busy red worms and kitchen scraps. The worms digest the kitchen waste and fertilize the surrounding soil with what they leave behind. 
We would love to have you join us for one (or all!) of the next scheduled work days:
Saturday, March 29: 9 am-noon
Friday, April 4: 3-6 pm
Friday, April 11: 3-6 pm There’s lettuce already planted, and hope for spinach. We’re using a layer of hay for mulch: this keeps the soil temperature even and saves water by reducing evaporation. 
In the center of the garden—next to the purple bench that my mom painted years ago—is a circle of native plants that were donated by the Irvine Ranch Conservancy. These were grown from seed harvested from our Orange County wildlands, and we are grateful for such a wonderful gift. 
The white pipe sticking up is one of our “worm tubes” — an eight-inch plastic pipe with holes drilled in the sides and filled with busy red worms and kitchen scraps. The worms digest the kitchen waste and fertilize the surrounding soil with what they leave behind. 
We would love to have you join us for one (or all!) of the next scheduled work days:
Saturday, March 29: 9 am-noon
Friday, April 4: 3-6 pm
Friday, April 11: 3-6 pm There’s lettuce already planted, and hope for spinach. We’re using a layer of hay for mulch: this keeps the soil temperature even and saves water by reducing evaporation. 
In the center of the garden—next to the purple bench that my mom painted years ago—is a circle of native plants that were donated by the Irvine Ranch Conservancy. These were grown from seed harvested from our Orange County wildlands, and we are grateful for such a wonderful gift. 
The white pipe sticking up is one of our “worm tubes” — an eight-inch plastic pipe with holes drilled in the sides and filled with busy red worms and kitchen scraps. The worms digest the kitchen waste and fertilize the surrounding soil with what they leave behind. 
We would love to have you join us for one (or all!) of the next scheduled work days:
Saturday, March 29: 9 am-noon
Friday, April 4: 3-6 pm
Friday, April 11: 3-6 pm There’s lettuce already planted, and hope for spinach. We’re using a layer of hay for mulch: this keeps the soil temperature even and saves water by reducing evaporation. 
In the center of the garden—next to the purple bench that my mom painted years ago—is a circle of native plants that were donated by the Irvine Ranch Conservancy. These were grown from seed harvested from our Orange County wildlands, and we are grateful for such a wonderful gift. 
The white pipe sticking up is one of our “worm tubes” — an eight-inch plastic pipe with holes drilled in the sides and filled with busy red worms and kitchen scraps. The worms digest the kitchen waste and fertilize the surrounding soil with what they leave behind. 
We would love to have you join us for one (or all!) of the next scheduled work days:
Saturday, March 29: 9 am-noon
Friday, April 4: 3-6 pm
Friday, April 11: 3-6 pm

There’s lettuce already planted, and hope for spinach. We’re using a layer of hay for mulch: this keeps the soil temperature even and saves water by reducing evaporation. 

In the center of the garden—next to the purple bench that my mom painted years ago—is a circle of native plants that were donated by the Irvine Ranch Conservancy. These were grown from seed harvested from our Orange County wildlands, and we are grateful for such a wonderful gift. 

The white pipe sticking up is one of our “worm tubes” — an eight-inch plastic pipe with holes drilled in the sides and filled with busy red worms and kitchen scraps. The worms digest the kitchen waste and fertilize the surrounding soil with what they leave behind. 

We would love to have you join us for one (or all!) of the next scheduled work days:

Saturday, March 29: 9 am-noon

Friday, April 4: 3-6 pm

Friday, April 11: 3-6 pm

First work day in the Heritage Garden = dirt and plants and fun!

Saturday, March 23, from 3-6 pm we had a great group of 30 students, faculty, staff, and community members help with clean-up and planting.

Here’s a few photos from my beat-up little camera (I can’t wait until our Heritage Garden Naturalist Sofia Speakman has a chance to send me some of her pictures.)

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Thanks to all who helped!

Our next work day is Saturday, March 29, from 9am to noon. Come and join the fun!