October: a great month for planting in So Cal!
Our Community Restoration Day this afternoon gave us a chance to clear out some spent plants and tuck new seeds into freshly prepared beds, all the while enjoying the cooler temps and inviting light of mid-October.
The scarecrows are still waiting for you to sit with them for a bit, maybe take a pumpkin selfie, or just rest on a straw bale and inhale the sights, sounds, smells of a garden in the fall. October: a great month for planting in So Cal!
Our Community Restoration Day this afternoon gave us a chance to clear out some spent plants and tuck new seeds into freshly prepared beds, all the while enjoying the cooler temps and inviting light of mid-October.
The scarecrows are still waiting for you to sit with them for a bit, maybe take a pumpkin selfie, or just rest on a straw bale and inhale the sights, sounds, smells of a garden in the fall. October: a great month for planting in So Cal!
Our Community Restoration Day this afternoon gave us a chance to clear out some spent plants and tuck new seeds into freshly prepared beds, all the while enjoying the cooler temps and inviting light of mid-October.
The scarecrows are still waiting for you to sit with them for a bit, maybe take a pumpkin selfie, or just rest on a straw bale and inhale the sights, sounds, smells of a garden in the fall. October: a great month for planting in So Cal!
Our Community Restoration Day this afternoon gave us a chance to clear out some spent plants and tuck new seeds into freshly prepared beds, all the while enjoying the cooler temps and inviting light of mid-October.
The scarecrows are still waiting for you to sit with them for a bit, maybe take a pumpkin selfie, or just rest on a straw bale and inhale the sights, sounds, smells of a garden in the fall. October: a great month for planting in So Cal!
Our Community Restoration Day this afternoon gave us a chance to clear out some spent plants and tuck new seeds into freshly prepared beds, all the while enjoying the cooler temps and inviting light of mid-October.
The scarecrows are still waiting for you to sit with them for a bit, maybe take a pumpkin selfie, or just rest on a straw bale and inhale the sights, sounds, smells of a garden in the fall. October: a great month for planting in So Cal!
Our Community Restoration Day this afternoon gave us a chance to clear out some spent plants and tuck new seeds into freshly prepared beds, all the while enjoying the cooler temps and inviting light of mid-October.
The scarecrows are still waiting for you to sit with them for a bit, maybe take a pumpkin selfie, or just rest on a straw bale and inhale the sights, sounds, smells of a garden in the fall. October: a great month for planting in So Cal!
Our Community Restoration Day this afternoon gave us a chance to clear out some spent plants and tuck new seeds into freshly prepared beds, all the while enjoying the cooler temps and inviting light of mid-October.
The scarecrows are still waiting for you to sit with them for a bit, maybe take a pumpkin selfie, or just rest on a straw bale and inhale the sights, sounds, smells of a garden in the fall. October: a great month for planting in So Cal!
Our Community Restoration Day this afternoon gave us a chance to clear out some spent plants and tuck new seeds into freshly prepared beds, all the while enjoying the cooler temps and inviting light of mid-October.
The scarecrows are still waiting for you to sit with them for a bit, maybe take a pumpkin selfie, or just rest on a straw bale and inhale the sights, sounds, smells of a garden in the fall. October: a great month for planting in So Cal!
Our Community Restoration Day this afternoon gave us a chance to clear out some spent plants and tuck new seeds into freshly prepared beds, all the while enjoying the cooler temps and inviting light of mid-October.
The scarecrows are still waiting for you to sit with them for a bit, maybe take a pumpkin selfie, or just rest on a straw bale and inhale the sights, sounds, smells of a garden in the fall. October: a great month for planting in So Cal!
Our Community Restoration Day this afternoon gave us a chance to clear out some spent plants and tuck new seeds into freshly prepared beds, all the while enjoying the cooler temps and inviting light of mid-October.
The scarecrows are still waiting for you to sit with them for a bit, maybe take a pumpkin selfie, or just rest on a straw bale and inhale the sights, sounds, smells of a garden in the fall.

October: a great month for planting in So Cal!

Our Community Restoration Day this afternoon gave us a chance to clear out some spent plants and tuck new seeds into freshly prepared beds, all the while enjoying the cooler temps and inviting light of mid-October.

The scarecrows are still waiting for you to sit with them for a bit, maybe take a pumpkin selfie, or just rest on a straw bale and inhale the sights, sounds, smells of a garden in the fall.

Whew … while it wasn’t as hot as a week ago, it was still a warm afternoon in the Heritage Garden today. 
But there were so many “cool” people helping out, it made for a very pleasant afternoon indeed!
Today’s highlights: scarecrows now make their homes in the garden … not to scare crows away, but to provide company for folks who stop by to sit and enjoy the beauty of pungent basil, brilliant zinnias, busy lizards, and all the sensory fabulousness that the garden provides.
Thanks to the Concordia and community friends who added to the garden’s story today … raking, picking up trash, harvesting green beans and butternuts, creating straw creatures, drawing our attention to delicate snail shells … and all the other stewardship that went on today.
A special thank-you to our friends from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, for all their help. In the photo above, you can see John working away clearing dead mustard stalks … and in the background is the hilltop where Acjachemen ancestors made their lives in this pleasant place for thousands of years. 
What a privilege to bring this place our respect as we work together to restore it; we invite you to join us for the next restoration days will be Saturday, Oct. 11, 9am-noon, and Sunday, Oct. 19, 2-5 pm. 
(And, in the meantime, stop by for “scarecrow selfie” while the pumpkins last … .)

Whew … while it wasn’t as hot as a week ago, it was still a warm afternoon in the Heritage Garden today. 
But there were so many “cool” people helping out, it made for a very pleasant afternoon indeed!
Today’s highlights: scarecrows now make their homes in the garden … not to scare crows away, but to provide company for folks who stop by to sit and enjoy the beauty of pungent basil, brilliant zinnias, busy lizards, and all the sensory fabulousness that the garden provides.
Thanks to the Concordia and community friends who added to the garden’s story today … raking, picking up trash, harvesting green beans and butternuts, creating straw creatures, drawing our attention to delicate snail shells … and all the other stewardship that went on today.
A special thank-you to our friends from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, for all their help. In the photo above, you can see John working away clearing dead mustard stalks … and in the background is the hilltop where Acjachemen ancestors made their lives in this pleasant place for thousands of years. 
What a privilege to bring this place our respect as we work together to restore it; we invite you to join us for the next restoration days will be Saturday, Oct. 11, 9am-noon, and Sunday, Oct. 19, 2-5 pm. 
(And, in the meantime, stop by for “scarecrow selfie” while the pumpkins last … .)

Whew … while it wasn’t as hot as a week ago, it was still a warm afternoon in the Heritage Garden today. 
But there were so many “cool” people helping out, it made for a very pleasant afternoon indeed!
Today’s highlights: scarecrows now make their homes in the garden … not to scare crows away, but to provide company for folks who stop by to sit and enjoy the beauty of pungent basil, brilliant zinnias, busy lizards, and all the sensory fabulousness that the garden provides.
Thanks to the Concordia and community friends who added to the garden’s story today … raking, picking up trash, harvesting green beans and butternuts, creating straw creatures, drawing our attention to delicate snail shells … and all the other stewardship that went on today.
A special thank-you to our friends from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, for all their help. In the photo above, you can see John working away clearing dead mustard stalks … and in the background is the hilltop where Acjachemen ancestors made their lives in this pleasant place for thousands of years. 
What a privilege to bring this place our respect as we work together to restore it; we invite you to join us for the next restoration days will be Saturday, Oct. 11, 9am-noon, and Sunday, Oct. 19, 2-5 pm. 
(And, in the meantime, stop by for “scarecrow selfie” while the pumpkins last … .)

Whew … while it wasn’t as hot as a week ago, it was still a warm afternoon in the Heritage Garden today. 
But there were so many “cool” people helping out, it made for a very pleasant afternoon indeed!
Today’s highlights: scarecrows now make their homes in the garden … not to scare crows away, but to provide company for folks who stop by to sit and enjoy the beauty of pungent basil, brilliant zinnias, busy lizards, and all the sensory fabulousness that the garden provides.
Thanks to the Concordia and community friends who added to the garden’s story today … raking, picking up trash, harvesting green beans and butternuts, creating straw creatures, drawing our attention to delicate snail shells … and all the other stewardship that went on today.
A special thank-you to our friends from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, for all their help. In the photo above, you can see John working away clearing dead mustard stalks … and in the background is the hilltop where Acjachemen ancestors made their lives in this pleasant place for thousands of years. 
What a privilege to bring this place our respect as we work together to restore it; we invite you to join us for the next restoration days will be Saturday, Oct. 11, 9am-noon, and Sunday, Oct. 19, 2-5 pm. 
(And, in the meantime, stop by for “scarecrow selfie” while the pumpkins last … .)

Whew … while it wasn’t as hot as a week ago, it was still a warm afternoon in the Heritage Garden today. 
But there were so many “cool” people helping out, it made for a very pleasant afternoon indeed!
Today’s highlights: scarecrows now make their homes in the garden … not to scare crows away, but to provide company for folks who stop by to sit and enjoy the beauty of pungent basil, brilliant zinnias, busy lizards, and all the sensory fabulousness that the garden provides.
Thanks to the Concordia and community friends who added to the garden’s story today … raking, picking up trash, harvesting green beans and butternuts, creating straw creatures, drawing our attention to delicate snail shells … and all the other stewardship that went on today.
A special thank-you to our friends from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, for all their help. In the photo above, you can see John working away clearing dead mustard stalks … and in the background is the hilltop where Acjachemen ancestors made their lives in this pleasant place for thousands of years. 
What a privilege to bring this place our respect as we work together to restore it; we invite you to join us for the next restoration days will be Saturday, Oct. 11, 9am-noon, and Sunday, Oct. 19, 2-5 pm. 
(And, in the meantime, stop by for “scarecrow selfie” while the pumpkins last … .)

Whew … while it wasn’t as hot as a week ago, it was still a warm afternoon in the Heritage Garden today. 
But there were so many “cool” people helping out, it made for a very pleasant afternoon indeed!
Today’s highlights: scarecrows now make their homes in the garden … not to scare crows away, but to provide company for folks who stop by to sit and enjoy the beauty of pungent basil, brilliant zinnias, busy lizards, and all the sensory fabulousness that the garden provides.
Thanks to the Concordia and community friends who added to the garden’s story today … raking, picking up trash, harvesting green beans and butternuts, creating straw creatures, drawing our attention to delicate snail shells … and all the other stewardship that went on today.
A special thank-you to our friends from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, for all their help. In the photo above, you can see John working away clearing dead mustard stalks … and in the background is the hilltop where Acjachemen ancestors made their lives in this pleasant place for thousands of years. 
What a privilege to bring this place our respect as we work together to restore it; we invite you to join us for the next restoration days will be Saturday, Oct. 11, 9am-noon, and Sunday, Oct. 19, 2-5 pm. 
(And, in the meantime, stop by for “scarecrow selfie” while the pumpkins last … .)

Whew … while it wasn’t as hot as a week ago, it was still a warm afternoon in the Heritage Garden today. 
But there were so many “cool” people helping out, it made for a very pleasant afternoon indeed!
Today’s highlights: scarecrows now make their homes in the garden … not to scare crows away, but to provide company for folks who stop by to sit and enjoy the beauty of pungent basil, brilliant zinnias, busy lizards, and all the sensory fabulousness that the garden provides.
Thanks to the Concordia and community friends who added to the garden’s story today … raking, picking up trash, harvesting green beans and butternuts, creating straw creatures, drawing our attention to delicate snail shells … and all the other stewardship that went on today.
A special thank-you to our friends from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, for all their help. In the photo above, you can see John working away clearing dead mustard stalks … and in the background is the hilltop where Acjachemen ancestors made their lives in this pleasant place for thousands of years. 
What a privilege to bring this place our respect as we work together to restore it; we invite you to join us for the next restoration days will be Saturday, Oct. 11, 9am-noon, and Sunday, Oct. 19, 2-5 pm. 
(And, in the meantime, stop by for “scarecrow selfie” while the pumpkins last … .)

Whew … while it wasn’t as hot as a week ago, it was still a warm afternoon in the Heritage Garden today. 
But there were so many “cool” people helping out, it made for a very pleasant afternoon indeed!
Today’s highlights: scarecrows now make their homes in the garden … not to scare crows away, but to provide company for folks who stop by to sit and enjoy the beauty of pungent basil, brilliant zinnias, busy lizards, and all the sensory fabulousness that the garden provides.
Thanks to the Concordia and community friends who added to the garden’s story today … raking, picking up trash, harvesting green beans and butternuts, creating straw creatures, drawing our attention to delicate snail shells … and all the other stewardship that went on today.
A special thank-you to our friends from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, for all their help. In the photo above, you can see John working away clearing dead mustard stalks … and in the background is the hilltop where Acjachemen ancestors made their lives in this pleasant place for thousands of years. 
What a privilege to bring this place our respect as we work together to restore it; we invite you to join us for the next restoration days will be Saturday, Oct. 11, 9am-noon, and Sunday, Oct. 19, 2-5 pm. 
(And, in the meantime, stop by for “scarecrow selfie” while the pumpkins last … .)

Whew … while it wasn’t as hot as a week ago, it was still a warm afternoon in the Heritage Garden today. 
But there were so many “cool” people helping out, it made for a very pleasant afternoon indeed!
Today’s highlights: scarecrows now make their homes in the garden … not to scare crows away, but to provide company for folks who stop by to sit and enjoy the beauty of pungent basil, brilliant zinnias, busy lizards, and all the sensory fabulousness that the garden provides.
Thanks to the Concordia and community friends who added to the garden’s story today … raking, picking up trash, harvesting green beans and butternuts, creating straw creatures, drawing our attention to delicate snail shells … and all the other stewardship that went on today.
A special thank-you to our friends from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, for all their help. In the photo above, you can see John working away clearing dead mustard stalks … and in the background is the hilltop where Acjachemen ancestors made their lives in this pleasant place for thousands of years. 
What a privilege to bring this place our respect as we work together to restore it; we invite you to join us for the next restoration days will be Saturday, Oct. 11, 9am-noon, and Sunday, Oct. 19, 2-5 pm. 
(And, in the meantime, stop by for “scarecrow selfie” while the pumpkins last … .)

Whew … while it wasn’t as hot as a week ago, it was still a warm afternoon in the Heritage Garden today. 

But there were so many “cool” people helping out, it made for a very pleasant afternoon indeed!

Today’s highlights: scarecrows now make their homes in the garden … not to scare crows away, but to provide company for folks who stop by to sit and enjoy the beauty of pungent basil, brilliant zinnias, busy lizards, and all the sensory fabulousness that the garden provides.

Thanks to the Concordia and community friends who added to the garden’s story today … raking, picking up trash, harvesting green beans and butternuts, creating straw creatures, drawing our attention to delicate snail shells … and all the other stewardship that went on today.

A special thank-you to our friends from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, for all their help. In the photo above, you can see John working away clearing dead mustard stalks … and in the background is the hilltop where Acjachemen ancestors made their lives in this pleasant place for thousands of years. 

What a privilege to bring this place our respect as we work together to restore it; we invite you to join us for the next restoration days will be Saturday, Oct. 11, 9am-noon, and Sunday, Oct. 19, 2-5 pm. 

(And, in the meantime, stop by for “scarecrow selfie” while the pumpkins last … .)

Looking Back, Looking Ahead
The photos above (all taken by Heritage Garden student-naturalist-photographer Sofia Speakman) give a glimpse of the rewarding work that went on at our last community restoration day, when close to 60 generous folks from around Orange County donated their time and muscle to pick up trash, rake weeds, dig garden beds, plant seeds and trees … and the list goes on … 
Please join the fun at either/both of our September events:
Saturday, Sept. 13, from 9 am - noon
Sunday, Sept. 21, from 2-5 pm
Students, faculty, staff, and community members are all invited!
Email Heritage Garden Coordinator Thea Gavin if you have questions: thea.gavin@cui.edu
Thanks, volunteers! You “make” the Garden! Looking Back, Looking Ahead
The photos above (all taken by Heritage Garden student-naturalist-photographer Sofia Speakman) give a glimpse of the rewarding work that went on at our last community restoration day, when close to 60 generous folks from around Orange County donated their time and muscle to pick up trash, rake weeds, dig garden beds, plant seeds and trees … and the list goes on … 
Please join the fun at either/both of our September events:
Saturday, Sept. 13, from 9 am - noon
Sunday, Sept. 21, from 2-5 pm
Students, faculty, staff, and community members are all invited!
Email Heritage Garden Coordinator Thea Gavin if you have questions: thea.gavin@cui.edu
Thanks, volunteers! You “make” the Garden! Looking Back, Looking Ahead
The photos above (all taken by Heritage Garden student-naturalist-photographer Sofia Speakman) give a glimpse of the rewarding work that went on at our last community restoration day, when close to 60 generous folks from around Orange County donated their time and muscle to pick up trash, rake weeds, dig garden beds, plant seeds and trees … and the list goes on … 
Please join the fun at either/both of our September events:
Saturday, Sept. 13, from 9 am - noon
Sunday, Sept. 21, from 2-5 pm
Students, faculty, staff, and community members are all invited!
Email Heritage Garden Coordinator Thea Gavin if you have questions: thea.gavin@cui.edu
Thanks, volunteers! You “make” the Garden! Looking Back, Looking Ahead
The photos above (all taken by Heritage Garden student-naturalist-photographer Sofia Speakman) give a glimpse of the rewarding work that went on at our last community restoration day, when close to 60 generous folks from around Orange County donated their time and muscle to pick up trash, rake weeds, dig garden beds, plant seeds and trees … and the list goes on … 
Please join the fun at either/both of our September events:
Saturday, Sept. 13, from 9 am - noon
Sunday, Sept. 21, from 2-5 pm
Students, faculty, staff, and community members are all invited!
Email Heritage Garden Coordinator Thea Gavin if you have questions: thea.gavin@cui.edu
Thanks, volunteers! You “make” the Garden! Looking Back, Looking Ahead
The photos above (all taken by Heritage Garden student-naturalist-photographer Sofia Speakman) give a glimpse of the rewarding work that went on at our last community restoration day, when close to 60 generous folks from around Orange County donated their time and muscle to pick up trash, rake weeds, dig garden beds, plant seeds and trees … and the list goes on … 
Please join the fun at either/both of our September events:
Saturday, Sept. 13, from 9 am - noon
Sunday, Sept. 21, from 2-5 pm
Students, faculty, staff, and community members are all invited!
Email Heritage Garden Coordinator Thea Gavin if you have questions: thea.gavin@cui.edu
Thanks, volunteers! You “make” the Garden! Looking Back, Looking Ahead
The photos above (all taken by Heritage Garden student-naturalist-photographer Sofia Speakman) give a glimpse of the rewarding work that went on at our last community restoration day, when close to 60 generous folks from around Orange County donated their time and muscle to pick up trash, rake weeds, dig garden beds, plant seeds and trees … and the list goes on … 
Please join the fun at either/both of our September events:
Saturday, Sept. 13, from 9 am - noon
Sunday, Sept. 21, from 2-5 pm
Students, faculty, staff, and community members are all invited!
Email Heritage Garden Coordinator Thea Gavin if you have questions: thea.gavin@cui.edu
Thanks, volunteers! You “make” the Garden! Looking Back, Looking Ahead
The photos above (all taken by Heritage Garden student-naturalist-photographer Sofia Speakman) give a glimpse of the rewarding work that went on at our last community restoration day, when close to 60 generous folks from around Orange County donated their time and muscle to pick up trash, rake weeds, dig garden beds, plant seeds and trees … and the list goes on … 
Please join the fun at either/both of our September events:
Saturday, Sept. 13, from 9 am - noon
Sunday, Sept. 21, from 2-5 pm
Students, faculty, staff, and community members are all invited!
Email Heritage Garden Coordinator Thea Gavin if you have questions: thea.gavin@cui.edu
Thanks, volunteers! You “make” the Garden! Looking Back, Looking Ahead
The photos above (all taken by Heritage Garden student-naturalist-photographer Sofia Speakman) give a glimpse of the rewarding work that went on at our last community restoration day, when close to 60 generous folks from around Orange County donated their time and muscle to pick up trash, rake weeds, dig garden beds, plant seeds and trees … and the list goes on … 
Please join the fun at either/both of our September events:
Saturday, Sept. 13, from 9 am - noon
Sunday, Sept. 21, from 2-5 pm
Students, faculty, staff, and community members are all invited!
Email Heritage Garden Coordinator Thea Gavin if you have questions: thea.gavin@cui.edu
Thanks, volunteers! You “make” the Garden! Looking Back, Looking Ahead
The photos above (all taken by Heritage Garden student-naturalist-photographer Sofia Speakman) give a glimpse of the rewarding work that went on at our last community restoration day, when close to 60 generous folks from around Orange County donated their time and muscle to pick up trash, rake weeds, dig garden beds, plant seeds and trees … and the list goes on … 
Please join the fun at either/both of our September events:
Saturday, Sept. 13, from 9 am - noon
Sunday, Sept. 21, from 2-5 pm
Students, faculty, staff, and community members are all invited!
Email Heritage Garden Coordinator Thea Gavin if you have questions: thea.gavin@cui.edu
Thanks, volunteers! You “make” the Garden! Looking Back, Looking Ahead
The photos above (all taken by Heritage Garden student-naturalist-photographer Sofia Speakman) give a glimpse of the rewarding work that went on at our last community restoration day, when close to 60 generous folks from around Orange County donated their time and muscle to pick up trash, rake weeds, dig garden beds, plant seeds and trees … and the list goes on … 
Please join the fun at either/both of our September events:
Saturday, Sept. 13, from 9 am - noon
Sunday, Sept. 21, from 2-5 pm
Students, faculty, staff, and community members are all invited!
Email Heritage Garden Coordinator Thea Gavin if you have questions: thea.gavin@cui.edu
Thanks, volunteers! You “make” the Garden!

Looking Back, Looking Ahead

The photos above (all taken by Heritage Garden student-naturalist-photographer Sofia Speakman) give a glimpse of the rewarding work that went on at our last community restoration day, when close to 60 generous folks from around Orange County donated their time and muscle to pick up trash, rake weeds, dig garden beds, plant seeds and trees … and the list goes on … 

Please join the fun at either/both of our September events:

Saturday, Sept. 13, from 9 am - noon

Sunday, Sept. 21, from 2-5 pm

Students, faculty, staff, and community members are all invited!

Email Heritage Garden Coordinator Thea Gavin if you have questions: thea.gavin@cui.edu

Thanks, volunteers! You “make” the Garden!

Neighbors
The Heritage Garden is blessed to have a core of dedicated volunteers who visit when they can to do garden maintenance and habitat restoration. 
One Irvine resident (California Native Plant Society member, poet, and friend) has adopted the “habitat restoration” mission of the garden wholeheartedly,  and several time a week he visits with tools and camera in hand to wage war against the non-native invasive plants (such as artichoke thistle, castor bean, hemlock, black mustard … ) that have choked out most (but not all!) of the native plants over the years.
You may not notice Chuck’s work … it’s tough to appreciate what ISN’T there, but the Heritage Garden is becoming more and more weedless as the weeks go by, thanks to Chuck Wright’s perseverance. 
And he’s not only a skilled restorationist … Chuck also makes beautiful photographic images and writes evocative poems about wherever he happens to be.
The images (of some Heritage Garden neighbors) above are Chuck’s, as is the poem below (written in Chuck’s signature style … the title is the date, and the place appears at the bottom of the free-flowing lines).
Thank you, Chuck, for working to make the Heritage Garden a place of beauty … and for helping us see that beauty in new ways via your words and images.
04-01-14
 a kitchen midden      calls to mind a dump site          meals past               native american sites
today a garden grows        over modern midden                    dump site                         trash strewn                               concrete    stucco    building waste                                   & grass clippings too
yet    a   site   of   dreams      native plants           fruits & veggies                a gathering of students teachers families & friendsseeds of hope sown       seedlings transplanted              paths created                  worm houses dug                       bird bath installed

critters come      birds bees bugs & flies           lizards welcome                 food & water provided all will be nourished      yes    gophers & ground squirrels too           these then encourage predators bobcat                 coyote snakes and raptorsall will be nourished sometimes by each othermuch to learn      much to share          a very special garden              a dump no morefrom trash to treasure      today a garden growsThe Heritage GardenConcordia University Irvine Neighbors
The Heritage Garden is blessed to have a core of dedicated volunteers who visit when they can to do garden maintenance and habitat restoration. 
One Irvine resident (California Native Plant Society member, poet, and friend) has adopted the “habitat restoration” mission of the garden wholeheartedly,  and several time a week he visits with tools and camera in hand to wage war against the non-native invasive plants (such as artichoke thistle, castor bean, hemlock, black mustard … ) that have choked out most (but not all!) of the native plants over the years.
You may not notice Chuck’s work … it’s tough to appreciate what ISN’T there, but the Heritage Garden is becoming more and more weedless as the weeks go by, thanks to Chuck Wright’s perseverance. 
And he’s not only a skilled restorationist … Chuck also makes beautiful photographic images and writes evocative poems about wherever he happens to be.
The images (of some Heritage Garden neighbors) above are Chuck’s, as is the poem below (written in Chuck’s signature style … the title is the date, and the place appears at the bottom of the free-flowing lines).
Thank you, Chuck, for working to make the Heritage Garden a place of beauty … and for helping us see that beauty in new ways via your words and images.
04-01-14
 a kitchen midden      calls to mind a dump site          meals past               native american sites
today a garden grows        over modern midden                    dump site                         trash strewn                               concrete    stucco    building waste                                   & grass clippings too
yet    a   site   of   dreams      native plants           fruits & veggies                a gathering of students teachers families & friendsseeds of hope sown       seedlings transplanted              paths created                  worm houses dug                       bird bath installed

critters come      birds bees bugs & flies           lizards welcome                 food & water provided all will be nourished      yes    gophers & ground squirrels too           these then encourage predators bobcat                 coyote snakes and raptorsall will be nourished sometimes by each othermuch to learn      much to share          a very special garden              a dump no morefrom trash to treasure      today a garden growsThe Heritage GardenConcordia University Irvine Neighbors
The Heritage Garden is blessed to have a core of dedicated volunteers who visit when they can to do garden maintenance and habitat restoration. 
One Irvine resident (California Native Plant Society member, poet, and friend) has adopted the “habitat restoration” mission of the garden wholeheartedly,  and several time a week he visits with tools and camera in hand to wage war against the non-native invasive plants (such as artichoke thistle, castor bean, hemlock, black mustard … ) that have choked out most (but not all!) of the native plants over the years.
You may not notice Chuck’s work … it’s tough to appreciate what ISN’T there, but the Heritage Garden is becoming more and more weedless as the weeks go by, thanks to Chuck Wright’s perseverance. 
And he’s not only a skilled restorationist … Chuck also makes beautiful photographic images and writes evocative poems about wherever he happens to be.
The images (of some Heritage Garden neighbors) above are Chuck’s, as is the poem below (written in Chuck’s signature style … the title is the date, and the place appears at the bottom of the free-flowing lines).
Thank you, Chuck, for working to make the Heritage Garden a place of beauty … and for helping us see that beauty in new ways via your words and images.
04-01-14
 a kitchen midden      calls to mind a dump site          meals past               native american sites
today a garden grows        over modern midden                    dump site                         trash strewn                               concrete    stucco    building waste                                   & grass clippings too
yet    a   site   of   dreams      native plants           fruits & veggies                a gathering of students teachers families & friendsseeds of hope sown       seedlings transplanted              paths created                  worm houses dug                       bird bath installed

critters come      birds bees bugs & flies           lizards welcome                 food & water provided all will be nourished      yes    gophers & ground squirrels too           these then encourage predators bobcat                 coyote snakes and raptorsall will be nourished sometimes by each othermuch to learn      much to share          a very special garden              a dump no morefrom trash to treasure      today a garden growsThe Heritage GardenConcordia University Irvine Neighbors
The Heritage Garden is blessed to have a core of dedicated volunteers who visit when they can to do garden maintenance and habitat restoration. 
One Irvine resident (California Native Plant Society member, poet, and friend) has adopted the “habitat restoration” mission of the garden wholeheartedly,  and several time a week he visits with tools and camera in hand to wage war against the non-native invasive plants (such as artichoke thistle, castor bean, hemlock, black mustard … ) that have choked out most (but not all!) of the native plants over the years.
You may not notice Chuck’s work … it’s tough to appreciate what ISN’T there, but the Heritage Garden is becoming more and more weedless as the weeks go by, thanks to Chuck Wright’s perseverance. 
And he’s not only a skilled restorationist … Chuck also makes beautiful photographic images and writes evocative poems about wherever he happens to be.
The images (of some Heritage Garden neighbors) above are Chuck’s, as is the poem below (written in Chuck’s signature style … the title is the date, and the place appears at the bottom of the free-flowing lines).
Thank you, Chuck, for working to make the Heritage Garden a place of beauty … and for helping us see that beauty in new ways via your words and images.
04-01-14
 a kitchen midden      calls to mind a dump site          meals past               native american sites
today a garden grows        over modern midden                    dump site                         trash strewn                               concrete    stucco    building waste                                   & grass clippings too
yet    a   site   of   dreams      native plants           fruits & veggies                a gathering of students teachers families & friendsseeds of hope sown       seedlings transplanted              paths created                  worm houses dug                       bird bath installed

critters come      birds bees bugs & flies           lizards welcome                 food & water provided all will be nourished      yes    gophers & ground squirrels too           these then encourage predators bobcat                 coyote snakes and raptorsall will be nourished sometimes by each othermuch to learn      much to share          a very special garden              a dump no morefrom trash to treasure      today a garden growsThe Heritage GardenConcordia University Irvine Neighbors
The Heritage Garden is blessed to have a core of dedicated volunteers who visit when they can to do garden maintenance and habitat restoration. 
One Irvine resident (California Native Plant Society member, poet, and friend) has adopted the “habitat restoration” mission of the garden wholeheartedly,  and several time a week he visits with tools and camera in hand to wage war against the non-native invasive plants (such as artichoke thistle, castor bean, hemlock, black mustard … ) that have choked out most (but not all!) of the native plants over the years.
You may not notice Chuck’s work … it’s tough to appreciate what ISN’T there, but the Heritage Garden is becoming more and more weedless as the weeks go by, thanks to Chuck Wright’s perseverance. 
And he’s not only a skilled restorationist … Chuck also makes beautiful photographic images and writes evocative poems about wherever he happens to be.
The images (of some Heritage Garden neighbors) above are Chuck’s, as is the poem below (written in Chuck’s signature style … the title is the date, and the place appears at the bottom of the free-flowing lines).
Thank you, Chuck, for working to make the Heritage Garden a place of beauty … and for helping us see that beauty in new ways via your words and images.
04-01-14
 a kitchen midden      calls to mind a dump site          meals past               native american sites
today a garden grows        over modern midden                    dump site                         trash strewn                               concrete    stucco    building waste                                   & grass clippings too
yet    a   site   of   dreams      native plants           fruits & veggies                a gathering of students teachers families & friendsseeds of hope sown       seedlings transplanted              paths created                  worm houses dug                       bird bath installed

critters come      birds bees bugs & flies           lizards welcome                 food & water provided all will be nourished      yes    gophers & ground squirrels too           these then encourage predators bobcat                 coyote snakes and raptorsall will be nourished sometimes by each othermuch to learn      much to share          a very special garden              a dump no morefrom trash to treasure      today a garden growsThe Heritage GardenConcordia University Irvine Neighbors
The Heritage Garden is blessed to have a core of dedicated volunteers who visit when they can to do garden maintenance and habitat restoration. 
One Irvine resident (California Native Plant Society member, poet, and friend) has adopted the “habitat restoration” mission of the garden wholeheartedly,  and several time a week he visits with tools and camera in hand to wage war against the non-native invasive plants (such as artichoke thistle, castor bean, hemlock, black mustard … ) that have choked out most (but not all!) of the native plants over the years.
You may not notice Chuck’s work … it’s tough to appreciate what ISN’T there, but the Heritage Garden is becoming more and more weedless as the weeks go by, thanks to Chuck Wright’s perseverance. 
And he’s not only a skilled restorationist … Chuck also makes beautiful photographic images and writes evocative poems about wherever he happens to be.
The images (of some Heritage Garden neighbors) above are Chuck’s, as is the poem below (written in Chuck’s signature style … the title is the date, and the place appears at the bottom of the free-flowing lines).
Thank you, Chuck, for working to make the Heritage Garden a place of beauty … and for helping us see that beauty in new ways via your words and images.
04-01-14
 a kitchen midden      calls to mind a dump site          meals past               native american sites
today a garden grows        over modern midden                    dump site                         trash strewn                               concrete    stucco    building waste                                   & grass clippings too
yet    a   site   of   dreams      native plants           fruits & veggies                a gathering of students teachers families & friendsseeds of hope sown       seedlings transplanted              paths created                  worm houses dug                       bird bath installed

critters come      birds bees bugs & flies           lizards welcome                 food & water provided all will be nourished      yes    gophers & ground squirrels too           these then encourage predators bobcat                 coyote snakes and raptorsall will be nourished sometimes by each othermuch to learn      much to share          a very special garden              a dump no morefrom trash to treasure      today a garden growsThe Heritage GardenConcordia University Irvine Neighbors
The Heritage Garden is blessed to have a core of dedicated volunteers who visit when they can to do garden maintenance and habitat restoration. 
One Irvine resident (California Native Plant Society member, poet, and friend) has adopted the “habitat restoration” mission of the garden wholeheartedly,  and several time a week he visits with tools and camera in hand to wage war against the non-native invasive plants (such as artichoke thistle, castor bean, hemlock, black mustard … ) that have choked out most (but not all!) of the native plants over the years.
You may not notice Chuck’s work … it’s tough to appreciate what ISN’T there, but the Heritage Garden is becoming more and more weedless as the weeks go by, thanks to Chuck Wright’s perseverance. 
And he’s not only a skilled restorationist … Chuck also makes beautiful photographic images and writes evocative poems about wherever he happens to be.
The images (of some Heritage Garden neighbors) above are Chuck’s, as is the poem below (written in Chuck’s signature style … the title is the date, and the place appears at the bottom of the free-flowing lines).
Thank you, Chuck, for working to make the Heritage Garden a place of beauty … and for helping us see that beauty in new ways via your words and images.
04-01-14
 a kitchen midden      calls to mind a dump site          meals past               native american sites
today a garden grows        over modern midden                    dump site                         trash strewn                               concrete    stucco    building waste                                   & grass clippings too
yet    a   site   of   dreams      native plants           fruits & veggies                a gathering of students teachers families & friendsseeds of hope sown       seedlings transplanted              paths created                  worm houses dug                       bird bath installed

critters come      birds bees bugs & flies           lizards welcome                 food & water provided all will be nourished      yes    gophers & ground squirrels too           these then encourage predators bobcat                 coyote snakes and raptorsall will be nourished sometimes by each othermuch to learn      much to share          a very special garden              a dump no morefrom trash to treasure      today a garden growsThe Heritage GardenConcordia University Irvine Neighbors
The Heritage Garden is blessed to have a core of dedicated volunteers who visit when they can to do garden maintenance and habitat restoration. 
One Irvine resident (California Native Plant Society member, poet, and friend) has adopted the “habitat restoration” mission of the garden wholeheartedly,  and several time a week he visits with tools and camera in hand to wage war against the non-native invasive plants (such as artichoke thistle, castor bean, hemlock, black mustard … ) that have choked out most (but not all!) of the native plants over the years.
You may not notice Chuck’s work … it’s tough to appreciate what ISN’T there, but the Heritage Garden is becoming more and more weedless as the weeks go by, thanks to Chuck Wright’s perseverance. 
And he’s not only a skilled restorationist … Chuck also makes beautiful photographic images and writes evocative poems about wherever he happens to be.
The images (of some Heritage Garden neighbors) above are Chuck’s, as is the poem below (written in Chuck’s signature style … the title is the date, and the place appears at the bottom of the free-flowing lines).
Thank you, Chuck, for working to make the Heritage Garden a place of beauty … and for helping us see that beauty in new ways via your words and images.
04-01-14
 a kitchen midden      calls to mind a dump site          meals past               native american sites
today a garden grows        over modern midden                    dump site                         trash strewn                               concrete    stucco    building waste                                   & grass clippings too
yet    a   site   of   dreams      native plants           fruits & veggies                a gathering of students teachers families & friendsseeds of hope sown       seedlings transplanted              paths created                  worm houses dug                       bird bath installed

critters come      birds bees bugs & flies           lizards welcome                 food & water provided all will be nourished      yes    gophers & ground squirrels too           these then encourage predators bobcat                 coyote snakes and raptorsall will be nourished sometimes by each othermuch to learn      much to share          a very special garden              a dump no morefrom trash to treasure      today a garden growsThe Heritage GardenConcordia University Irvine Neighbors
The Heritage Garden is blessed to have a core of dedicated volunteers who visit when they can to do garden maintenance and habitat restoration. 
One Irvine resident (California Native Plant Society member, poet, and friend) has adopted the “habitat restoration” mission of the garden wholeheartedly,  and several time a week he visits with tools and camera in hand to wage war against the non-native invasive plants (such as artichoke thistle, castor bean, hemlock, black mustard … ) that have choked out most (but not all!) of the native plants over the years.
You may not notice Chuck’s work … it’s tough to appreciate what ISN’T there, but the Heritage Garden is becoming more and more weedless as the weeks go by, thanks to Chuck Wright’s perseverance. 
And he’s not only a skilled restorationist … Chuck also makes beautiful photographic images and writes evocative poems about wherever he happens to be.
The images (of some Heritage Garden neighbors) above are Chuck’s, as is the poem below (written in Chuck’s signature style … the title is the date, and the place appears at the bottom of the free-flowing lines).
Thank you, Chuck, for working to make the Heritage Garden a place of beauty … and for helping us see that beauty in new ways via your words and images.
04-01-14
 a kitchen midden      calls to mind a dump site          meals past               native american sites
today a garden grows        over modern midden                    dump site                         trash strewn                               concrete    stucco    building waste                                   & grass clippings too
yet    a   site   of   dreams      native plants           fruits & veggies                a gathering of students teachers families & friendsseeds of hope sown       seedlings transplanted              paths created                  worm houses dug                       bird bath installed

critters come      birds bees bugs & flies           lizards welcome                 food & water provided all will be nourished      yes    gophers & ground squirrels too           these then encourage predators bobcat                 coyote snakes and raptorsall will be nourished sometimes by each othermuch to learn      much to share          a very special garden              a dump no morefrom trash to treasure      today a garden growsThe Heritage GardenConcordia University Irvine Neighbors
The Heritage Garden is blessed to have a core of dedicated volunteers who visit when they can to do garden maintenance and habitat restoration. 
One Irvine resident (California Native Plant Society member, poet, and friend) has adopted the “habitat restoration” mission of the garden wholeheartedly,  and several time a week he visits with tools and camera in hand to wage war against the non-native invasive plants (such as artichoke thistle, castor bean, hemlock, black mustard … ) that have choked out most (but not all!) of the native plants over the years.
You may not notice Chuck’s work … it’s tough to appreciate what ISN’T there, but the Heritage Garden is becoming more and more weedless as the weeks go by, thanks to Chuck Wright’s perseverance. 
And he’s not only a skilled restorationist … Chuck also makes beautiful photographic images and writes evocative poems about wherever he happens to be.
The images (of some Heritage Garden neighbors) above are Chuck’s, as is the poem below (written in Chuck’s signature style … the title is the date, and the place appears at the bottom of the free-flowing lines).
Thank you, Chuck, for working to make the Heritage Garden a place of beauty … and for helping us see that beauty in new ways via your words and images.
04-01-14
 a kitchen midden      calls to mind a dump site          meals past               native american sites
today a garden grows        over modern midden                    dump site                         trash strewn                               concrete    stucco    building waste                                   & grass clippings too
yet    a   site   of   dreams      native plants           fruits & veggies                a gathering of students teachers families & friendsseeds of hope sown       seedlings transplanted              paths created                  worm houses dug                       bird bath installed

critters come      birds bees bugs & flies           lizards welcome                 food & water provided all will be nourished      yes    gophers & ground squirrels too           these then encourage predators bobcat                 coyote snakes and raptorsall will be nourished sometimes by each othermuch to learn      much to share          a very special garden              a dump no morefrom trash to treasure      today a garden growsThe Heritage GardenConcordia University Irvine

Neighbors

The Heritage Garden is blessed to have a core of dedicated volunteers who visit when they can to do garden maintenance and habitat restoration. 


One Irvine resident (California Native Plant Society member, poet, and friend) has adopted the “habitat restoration” mission of the garden wholeheartedly,  and several time a week he visits with tools and camera in hand to wage war against the non-native invasive plants (such as artichoke thistle, castor bean, hemlock, black mustard … ) that have choked out most (but not all!) of the native plants over the years.

You may not notice Chuck’s work … it’s tough to appreciate what ISN’T there, but the Heritage Garden is becoming more and more weedless as the weeks go by, thanks to Chuck Wright’s perseverance. 

And he’s not only a skilled restorationist … Chuck also makes beautiful photographic images and writes evocative poems about wherever he happens to be.

The images (of some Heritage Garden neighbors) above are Chuck’s, as is the poem below (written in Chuck’s signature style … the title is the date, and the place appears at the bottom of the free-flowing lines).

Thank you, Chuck, for working to make the Heritage Garden a place of beauty … and for helping us see that beauty in new ways via your words and images.

04-01-14


a kitchen midden 
     calls to mind a dump site
          meals past
               native american sites


today a garden grows
        over modern midden
                    dump site
                         trash strewn
                               concrete    stucco    building waste
                                   & grass clippings too


yet    a   site   of   dreams
      native plants
           fruits & veggies
                a gathering of students teachers families & friends
seeds of hope sown
       seedlings transplanted
              paths created
                  worm houses dug
                       bird bath installed


critters come
      birds bees bugs & flies
           lizards welcome
                 food & water provided 
all will be nourished
      yes    gophers & ground squirrels too
           these then encourage predators bobcat
                 coyote snakes and raptors
all will be nourished sometimes by each other

much to learn 
     much to share
          a very special garden
              a dump no more
from trash to treasure
      today a garden grows

The Heritage Garden
Concordia University Irvine

What a wonderful day of community in the Heritage Garden! Close to 60 volunteers worked together on all kinds of projects—from replanting worm tubes to (very careful) castor bean removal to to pea planting to digging irrigation lines to trash pick-up to mulch spreading to path improvements to lizard castles (and much much more!).
Many thanks to Concordia alum Rob Meaux of Thrivent Financial for securing a community action grant to fund the day’s supplies, for donating yummy snacks and cool T-shirts, and for his support of the garden since its beginning.
Thanks also to Home Depot of Orange (Katella store) for helping us stretch our dollars … please take your business to this community-minded store and tell Pedro the Heritage Garden says he is awesome!
We appreciated all the volunteers from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, from the California Native Plant Society, from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Orange, from the faculty/staff/families of Concordia, from the community, and from our own wonderful CUI student body. 
It got a little warm and dusty and sweaty out there  … but everyone pitched in without complaining (except me … I might have said, “It’s hot out here” once or twice too many times).
We are making such progress in transforming this neglected corner of campus into a fabulous habitat where plants, critters, and people can come together,  and I’m looking forward to many more tomorrows of growth. What a wonderful day of community in the Heritage Garden! Close to 60 volunteers worked together on all kinds of projects—from replanting worm tubes to (very careful) castor bean removal to to pea planting to digging irrigation lines to trash pick-up to mulch spreading to path improvements to lizard castles (and much much more!).
Many thanks to Concordia alum Rob Meaux of Thrivent Financial for securing a community action grant to fund the day’s supplies, for donating yummy snacks and cool T-shirts, and for his support of the garden since its beginning.
Thanks also to Home Depot of Orange (Katella store) for helping us stretch our dollars … please take your business to this community-minded store and tell Pedro the Heritage Garden says he is awesome!
We appreciated all the volunteers from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, from the California Native Plant Society, from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Orange, from the faculty/staff/families of Concordia, from the community, and from our own wonderful CUI student body. 
It got a little warm and dusty and sweaty out there  … but everyone pitched in without complaining (except me … I might have said, “It’s hot out here” once or twice too many times).
We are making such progress in transforming this neglected corner of campus into a fabulous habitat where plants, critters, and people can come together,  and I’m looking forward to many more tomorrows of growth. What a wonderful day of community in the Heritage Garden! Close to 60 volunteers worked together on all kinds of projects—from replanting worm tubes to (very careful) castor bean removal to to pea planting to digging irrigation lines to trash pick-up to mulch spreading to path improvements to lizard castles (and much much more!).
Many thanks to Concordia alum Rob Meaux of Thrivent Financial for securing a community action grant to fund the day’s supplies, for donating yummy snacks and cool T-shirts, and for his support of the garden since its beginning.
Thanks also to Home Depot of Orange (Katella store) for helping us stretch our dollars … please take your business to this community-minded store and tell Pedro the Heritage Garden says he is awesome!
We appreciated all the volunteers from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, from the California Native Plant Society, from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Orange, from the faculty/staff/families of Concordia, from the community, and from our own wonderful CUI student body. 
It got a little warm and dusty and sweaty out there  … but everyone pitched in without complaining (except me … I might have said, “It’s hot out here” once or twice too many times).
We are making such progress in transforming this neglected corner of campus into a fabulous habitat where plants, critters, and people can come together,  and I’m looking forward to many more tomorrows of growth. What a wonderful day of community in the Heritage Garden! Close to 60 volunteers worked together on all kinds of projects—from replanting worm tubes to (very careful) castor bean removal to to pea planting to digging irrigation lines to trash pick-up to mulch spreading to path improvements to lizard castles (and much much more!).
Many thanks to Concordia alum Rob Meaux of Thrivent Financial for securing a community action grant to fund the day’s supplies, for donating yummy snacks and cool T-shirts, and for his support of the garden since its beginning.
Thanks also to Home Depot of Orange (Katella store) for helping us stretch our dollars … please take your business to this community-minded store and tell Pedro the Heritage Garden says he is awesome!
We appreciated all the volunteers from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, from the California Native Plant Society, from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Orange, from the faculty/staff/families of Concordia, from the community, and from our own wonderful CUI student body. 
It got a little warm and dusty and sweaty out there  … but everyone pitched in without complaining (except me … I might have said, “It’s hot out here” once or twice too many times).
We are making such progress in transforming this neglected corner of campus into a fabulous habitat where plants, critters, and people can come together,  and I’m looking forward to many more tomorrows of growth. What a wonderful day of community in the Heritage Garden! Close to 60 volunteers worked together on all kinds of projects—from replanting worm tubes to (very careful) castor bean removal to to pea planting to digging irrigation lines to trash pick-up to mulch spreading to path improvements to lizard castles (and much much more!).
Many thanks to Concordia alum Rob Meaux of Thrivent Financial for securing a community action grant to fund the day’s supplies, for donating yummy snacks and cool T-shirts, and for his support of the garden since its beginning.
Thanks also to Home Depot of Orange (Katella store) for helping us stretch our dollars … please take your business to this community-minded store and tell Pedro the Heritage Garden says he is awesome!
We appreciated all the volunteers from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, from the California Native Plant Society, from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Orange, from the faculty/staff/families of Concordia, from the community, and from our own wonderful CUI student body. 
It got a little warm and dusty and sweaty out there  … but everyone pitched in without complaining (except me … I might have said, “It’s hot out here” once or twice too many times).
We are making such progress in transforming this neglected corner of campus into a fabulous habitat where plants, critters, and people can come together,  and I’m looking forward to many more tomorrows of growth. What a wonderful day of community in the Heritage Garden! Close to 60 volunteers worked together on all kinds of projects—from replanting worm tubes to (very careful) castor bean removal to to pea planting to digging irrigation lines to trash pick-up to mulch spreading to path improvements to lizard castles (and much much more!).
Many thanks to Concordia alum Rob Meaux of Thrivent Financial for securing a community action grant to fund the day’s supplies, for donating yummy snacks and cool T-shirts, and for his support of the garden since its beginning.
Thanks also to Home Depot of Orange (Katella store) for helping us stretch our dollars … please take your business to this community-minded store and tell Pedro the Heritage Garden says he is awesome!
We appreciated all the volunteers from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, from the California Native Plant Society, from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Orange, from the faculty/staff/families of Concordia, from the community, and from our own wonderful CUI student body. 
It got a little warm and dusty and sweaty out there  … but everyone pitched in without complaining (except me … I might have said, “It’s hot out here” once or twice too many times).
We are making such progress in transforming this neglected corner of campus into a fabulous habitat where plants, critters, and people can come together,  and I’m looking forward to many more tomorrows of growth. What a wonderful day of community in the Heritage Garden! Close to 60 volunteers worked together on all kinds of projects—from replanting worm tubes to (very careful) castor bean removal to to pea planting to digging irrigation lines to trash pick-up to mulch spreading to path improvements to lizard castles (and much much more!).
Many thanks to Concordia alum Rob Meaux of Thrivent Financial for securing a community action grant to fund the day’s supplies, for donating yummy snacks and cool T-shirts, and for his support of the garden since its beginning.
Thanks also to Home Depot of Orange (Katella store) for helping us stretch our dollars … please take your business to this community-minded store and tell Pedro the Heritage Garden says he is awesome!
We appreciated all the volunteers from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, from the California Native Plant Society, from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Orange, from the faculty/staff/families of Concordia, from the community, and from our own wonderful CUI student body. 
It got a little warm and dusty and sweaty out there  … but everyone pitched in without complaining (except me … I might have said, “It’s hot out here” once or twice too many times).
We are making such progress in transforming this neglected corner of campus into a fabulous habitat where plants, critters, and people can come together,  and I’m looking forward to many more tomorrows of growth. What a wonderful day of community in the Heritage Garden! Close to 60 volunteers worked together on all kinds of projects—from replanting worm tubes to (very careful) castor bean removal to to pea planting to digging irrigation lines to trash pick-up to mulch spreading to path improvements to lizard castles (and much much more!).
Many thanks to Concordia alum Rob Meaux of Thrivent Financial for securing a community action grant to fund the day’s supplies, for donating yummy snacks and cool T-shirts, and for his support of the garden since its beginning.
Thanks also to Home Depot of Orange (Katella store) for helping us stretch our dollars … please take your business to this community-minded store and tell Pedro the Heritage Garden says he is awesome!
We appreciated all the volunteers from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, from the California Native Plant Society, from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Orange, from the faculty/staff/families of Concordia, from the community, and from our own wonderful CUI student body. 
It got a little warm and dusty and sweaty out there  … but everyone pitched in without complaining (except me … I might have said, “It’s hot out here” once or twice too many times).
We are making such progress in transforming this neglected corner of campus into a fabulous habitat where plants, critters, and people can come together,  and I’m looking forward to many more tomorrows of growth. What a wonderful day of community in the Heritage Garden! Close to 60 volunteers worked together on all kinds of projects—from replanting worm tubes to (very careful) castor bean removal to to pea planting to digging irrigation lines to trash pick-up to mulch spreading to path improvements to lizard castles (and much much more!).
Many thanks to Concordia alum Rob Meaux of Thrivent Financial for securing a community action grant to fund the day’s supplies, for donating yummy snacks and cool T-shirts, and for his support of the garden since its beginning.
Thanks also to Home Depot of Orange (Katella store) for helping us stretch our dollars … please take your business to this community-minded store and tell Pedro the Heritage Garden says he is awesome!
We appreciated all the volunteers from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, from the California Native Plant Society, from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Orange, from the faculty/staff/families of Concordia, from the community, and from our own wonderful CUI student body. 
It got a little warm and dusty and sweaty out there  … but everyone pitched in without complaining (except me … I might have said, “It’s hot out here” once or twice too many times).
We are making such progress in transforming this neglected corner of campus into a fabulous habitat where plants, critters, and people can come together,  and I’m looking forward to many more tomorrows of growth. What a wonderful day of community in the Heritage Garden! Close to 60 volunteers worked together on all kinds of projects—from replanting worm tubes to (very careful) castor bean removal to to pea planting to digging irrigation lines to trash pick-up to mulch spreading to path improvements to lizard castles (and much much more!).
Many thanks to Concordia alum Rob Meaux of Thrivent Financial for securing a community action grant to fund the day’s supplies, for donating yummy snacks and cool T-shirts, and for his support of the garden since its beginning.
Thanks also to Home Depot of Orange (Katella store) for helping us stretch our dollars … please take your business to this community-minded store and tell Pedro the Heritage Garden says he is awesome!
We appreciated all the volunteers from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, from the California Native Plant Society, from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Orange, from the faculty/staff/families of Concordia, from the community, and from our own wonderful CUI student body. 
It got a little warm and dusty and sweaty out there  … but everyone pitched in without complaining (except me … I might have said, “It’s hot out here” once or twice too many times).
We are making such progress in transforming this neglected corner of campus into a fabulous habitat where plants, critters, and people can come together,  and I’m looking forward to many more tomorrows of growth.

What a wonderful day of community in the Heritage Garden! Close to 60 volunteers worked together on all kinds of projects—from replanting worm tubes to (very careful) castor bean removal to to pea planting to digging irrigation lines to trash pick-up to mulch spreading to path improvements to lizard castles (and much much more!).

Many thanks to Concordia alum Rob Meaux of Thrivent Financial for securing a community action grant to fund the day’s supplies, for donating yummy snacks and cool T-shirts, and for his support of the garden since its beginning.

Thanks also to Home Depot of Orange (Katella store) for helping us stretch our dollars … please take your business to this community-minded store and tell Pedro the Heritage Garden says he is awesome!

We appreciated all the volunteers from the Juaneno Band of Mission Indians, Acjachemen Nation, from the California Native Plant Society, from St. John’s Lutheran Church in Orange, from the faculty/staff/families of Concordia, from the community, and from our own wonderful CUI student body. 

It got a little warm and dusty and sweaty out there  … but everyone pitched in without complaining (except me … I might have said, “It’s hot out here” once or twice too many times).

We are making such progress in transforming this neglected corner of campus into a fabulous habitat where plants, critters, and people can come together,  and I’m looking forward to many more tomorrows of growth.

A Timely (Student!) Essay about Gardening with Native Plants

This engaging essay was written by a first-semester student in the honors writing class that I teach, WRT 201, The Art of the Essay: Nature, Writing, and Nature Writing. With her permission, I offer it for your enjoyment:

Sofia Speakman

WRT 102H: Arguing for/against Nature

12 November 2013

Sanctuary

A breath of a breeze began to blow, softly at first, then stronger and faster. Circling around the cracked, grey bark of a cottonwood tree, the wind soared upwards and set the leaves in motion. Those heart-shaped leaves quivered with joy at the wind’s touch and sang out their gentle, rustling tones. Then, on a whim, the wind rushed down a sandy path between towering shrubs of mule fat and blue elderberry and clumps of fragrant, yellow-green sagebrush. It blew into the faces of a small group of people—explorers—with binoculars, field guides, and journals at the ready. Walking along the path, their leader, a naturalist, called out, “Look, children. Come see the California wild roses.”

We huddled round the beautiful plant with its pale pink flowers. Peering back at us with their cheery faces, the blossoms were more open than the typical garden rose. Their stamens and stigmas were visible like little yellow crowns.

“What are those?” one child asked, pointing towards some dangling red fruits, bright and glossy.

“Those are rose hips,” the naturalist replied, smiling. “They are safe to eat and are even a good source of vitamin C.”

After a few of the children tried the fruits, we moved on, our naturalist pointing out wonder after wonder. There was a western tiger swallowtail on sunny-colored wings; over there were some bush sunflowers, and in the sagebrush a common yellowthroat hid, singing his sweet, rapid song.

I never found out what rose hips tasted like. I was never one of those campers who were brave enough to try. But my time at the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary was filled with many other precious experiences and lessons through which I learned to appreciate this place and all its native plants and animals. Attending Sea and Sage Audubon’s bird camps summer after summer fed my love of nature throughout five years of my childhood and has helped shape me into who I am today. Birds, other wildlife, and their natural habitats were thoroughly engrained in my mind as something valuable, something to cherish and protect. My faith also bolstered the value of nature in my eyes, seeing it as God’s creation entrusted to us to care for.

Over the next four years, I returned to the sanctuary as a volunteer. During the summer before starting college, I helped the children complete an intriguing project—a comic book, hand drawn, about removing lawns. It urged people to replace their lawns with plants native to their area to recreate the unique beauty of original habitats and provide homes for wildlife.

Since the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary has been replanted with vegetation native to Irvine, it has truly become a sanctuary for nature to thrive. We too can create sanctuaries in our very own backyards. We can restore natural habitats through planting species of plants that are native to our region. Native gardening, especially in Southern California, is a commendable alternative to growing and maintaining lawns and exotic gardens.

Your typical American lawn, though seemingly innocuous, is filled with hidden dangers. The amount of toxic chemicals used on lawns annually is mind-boggling. As the article “Keep off the Grass” informs us, “Every year, Americans apply more than 80 million pounds of chemical products to their lawns and gardens, including herbicides, pesticides and fungicides” (Scullin 35). These chemicals affect not only targeted “pests,” but also cause harm to many beneficial species. Furthermore, the deadly toxins travel up the food chain, wreaking additional havoc. However, growing native plants, which “have developed their own defenses against many pests and diseases,” (Benefits of Native Plants) will lessen the need for pesticide use. In fact, a native garden helps restore ecosystems and is beneficial for native wildlife. Charlotte Seidenberg, an author and wildlife gardener, points out: “Each indigenous plant has the potential to attract an entire system of creatures, sized micro to macro” (26). These animals can find sanctuary in our very yards. So why would anyone hesitate to begin the adventure of native gardening?

Some people have a variety of misconceptions about native plants. They may think that native plants are very picky and hard to care for, or that the plants are unattractive and weed-like. Some neighbors who are used to the flat, pristine greenness of a lawn might object. In an article of Fremontia: the Journal of the California Native Plant Society, we learn that “many folks—when offered the native alternative—think of brown hillsides covered in dead weeds left over from winter rains. The fact of the matter is that most of the unattractive vegetation people see in open areas is comprised of invasive species which were introduced by early European settlers” (Moore 27). Southern California’s native plant-life may not be as bold and showy as many typical garden plants, but it is far from ugly. It holds a delicate and sometimes hidden beauty. You have to train your eyes to see—to see the cheery yellow of bush sunflowers, the sweeping, rosy branches of manzanita, the russet, white, and pink of buckwheat, and the silvery-green and bursts of purple of Cleveland sage. Also, the fear that native gardening will always be high maintenance can be put to rest. As Glenn Keator, botanist and teacher, points out, “Local native plants are already well adapted to the conditions of climate and soil, making them easy to grow and likely to succeed” (1). After the plants have been established, they are actually less work than a lawn.

Another concern of those considering renovating their yards is that some exotic plants and lawns have become part of America’s culture. People might not want to lose that. But native gardening can help people appreciate their home region in a whole new way. It shows them the unique features of their piece of earth. Keator asks in his overview of Designing Native Gardens:

What better way is there to remind ourselves of this special geographic region we call home than to recreate, in our own yards, the native gardens found in the   wild? Anyone can have a garden with roses (mostly hybrids from China and Europe), petunias (from South America), fuchsias (from mountainous South and Central America), and impatiens (many from Africa). But natives tell about  where we live; they make us feel at home. (1)

To me the sweet fragrance of sagebrush is the smell of home; the songs of birds—the melancholy whistle of a lesser goldfinch, the wild laughter of an acorn woodpecker, and the bouncy rhythmic song of a wrentit—are the voices of dear friends. We should celebrate and cherish the land that we are blessed with. It can become more than just our surroundings; it can become our Southern Californian heritage.

Native gardening in Southern California and other such dry climates is especially important. Author Dorothy Green warns us about the dangers of non-native plants: “Some exotic plants… gulp vast quantities of water and deprive local wildlife … of the habitat needed to survive” (163). Specifically in Orange County, conserving water is crucial since we live in a low-rainfall region, are dependent on outside water sources, and sometimes face droughts. “With dwindling water resources a stark reality…making the case for utilizing California native plants in suburban landscapes and gardens has become imperative” (Moore 24). This is one effective way of conserving our precious water. Water is a valuable resource that needs to be allocated carefully.

Money and time are additional resources that should be managed wisely. People are spending vast amounts of these on maintenance for their exotic plants. The author of The Lawn: A History of an American Obsession states, “American homeowners spend billions of dollars plus untold hours and energy on their front lawns every year” (Jenkins 2). All such people have choices to make about what kind of landscaping route to use. If they began replacing their exotic plants with natives, they would ultimately save money and time along with benefitting the environment.

The Environment. Nature. Creation. These are gifts—gifts from God. He put humankind in charge of this earth (Gen. 1:26). Native gardening is one way in which we humans can practice good stewardship over the gifts we have been given; through this we can help preserve nature for future generations and create balance between humans and the rest of creation.

The world needs more places like the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary, where humans and nature can exist side by side. What are we going to do with the little piece of earth entrusted to us? Be it a backyard, front yard, or potted plants on a patio, we can create or own sanctuaries by growing native plants.

I hope I will tend my own garden some day—a garden modeled after those original ecosystems in Southern California created by God. Paths would weave throughout a patchwork of sagebrush, buckwheat, and Cleveland sage full of skippers, bees, and butterflies. Birds would feast on elderberries, and western fence lizards would sun lazily on stepping-stones. Perhaps there would even be a natural pond, glassy and tranquil, and dragonflies would whir through my yard—flashes of color. And towering over the water like sentinels would grow a stand of cottonwoods. The wind would rustle through the leaves, filling the yard with peaceful music—a sanctuary, for people, plants, and animals.        

Works Cited

 “Benefits of Native Plants.” cnps.org. California Native Plant Society, 1999. Web. 12 Nov. 2013.

Green, Dorothy. Managing Water: Avoiding Crisis In California. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2007. eBook Academic Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 29 Oct. 2013.

Jenkins, Virginia Scott. The Lawn: A History of an American Obsession. Washington and London: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994. Print.

Keator, Glenn, and Alrie Middlebrook. Designing California Native Gardens: The Plant Community Approach to Artful, Ecological Gardens. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. 2007. books.google.com. Web. 12 Nov. 2013.

Moore, Rob. “The Art and Science of a Native Garden Design.” Fremontia: Journal of the California Native Plant Society 37.4/38.1, (2009/2010): 24-33. Web. 13 Oct. 2013.

Scullin, Wendy Munson. “Keep Off The Grass!.” E: The Environmental Magazine 16.3 (2005): 34-39. Science Full Text Select (H.W. Wilson). Web. 29 Oct. 2013.

Seidenberg, Charlotte. The Wildlife Garden: Planning Backyard Habitats. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1995. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 29 Oct. 2013.

To kick off the new semester (and fall gardening season), the Heritage Garden is holding a “Restoration Day for Campus and Community” on Saturday, Aug. 23, from 8:30 am to noon.

All are welcome—students, faculty, staff, family, community!

Thrivent is providing breakfast and some supplies (plants, etc.) … and there will be plenty of different tasks people can choose to take on (with leadership provided by members of the student garden club and “regular” Heritage Garden volunteers).

If you have any questions … contact Thea Gavin at thea.gavin@cui.edu.

Let’s work together!

 

The Good, the Bad, and the Buggy
Today’s visit to the Heritage Garden was rewarding as usual …
The Good:
The Big Max pumpkins continue to ripen (not getting much bigger, but definitely deepening in color)
The baby native plants—a generous donation from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy growing grounds—that we dug into the ground a month ago are doubling and tripling in size—even though we planted them at the “wrong” time of year: mid-summer. We planted them in a completely mustard-infested area, and are using mulch created from dead mustard stalks around some of the plants to keep the moisture in. (Other plants are mulched with local rock and/or shredded local trees from a recent campus tree-trimming.) The mulch is necessary because  … it’s mid-summer! And hot! Adding a layer of rocks/twigs to the soil surface really helps keep the soil surface temp lower (and also helps retain soil moisture). Win-win-win: mulch smothers weeds as well.
The watermelon are not numerous, but they are adorable—especially the stripey one (too bad I didn’t keep better records of what varieties were planted where).
There are LOTS of tomatoes. Yum.
The Bad: 
The green bean teepee has been completely co-opted by aphids. We tried to hand-squish them at the beginning (and this worked at our home garden, where we could take care of them every day), but the aphids won this round. Nothing to do but toss the plants on the compost heap, and try again next year. 
The Ugly: Lots of split veggies (see butternut photo, above), mean the watering system is not exactly working. I need to do more research, but from what I remember, splitting is the result of inconsistent watering, which makes sense, given the improvised nature of this first season’s irrigation. One more thing to learn from, which is what I love about gardening! (And all “mistakes” can be recycled on the compost pile.)
Another more mysterious “fail” — one of the hot pepper plants up and died pretty much overnight … it appears something might have severed the stem … maybe one of the critters digging holes throughout the garden. Oh well … one of the plants remains, and a few jalapenos go a long way …
The Fabulous: Our wonderful core of dedicated volunteers (from both campus and community) who have kept the garden watered, weeded, and harvested all summer. Thanks all!  The Good, the Bad, and the Buggy
Today’s visit to the Heritage Garden was rewarding as usual …
The Good:
The Big Max pumpkins continue to ripen (not getting much bigger, but definitely deepening in color)
The baby native plants—a generous donation from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy growing grounds—that we dug into the ground a month ago are doubling and tripling in size—even though we planted them at the “wrong” time of year: mid-summer. We planted them in a completely mustard-infested area, and are using mulch created from dead mustard stalks around some of the plants to keep the moisture in. (Other plants are mulched with local rock and/or shredded local trees from a recent campus tree-trimming.) The mulch is necessary because  … it’s mid-summer! And hot! Adding a layer of rocks/twigs to the soil surface really helps keep the soil surface temp lower (and also helps retain soil moisture). Win-win-win: mulch smothers weeds as well.
The watermelon are not numerous, but they are adorable—especially the stripey one (too bad I didn’t keep better records of what varieties were planted where).
There are LOTS of tomatoes. Yum.
The Bad: 
The green bean teepee has been completely co-opted by aphids. We tried to hand-squish them at the beginning (and this worked at our home garden, where we could take care of them every day), but the aphids won this round. Nothing to do but toss the plants on the compost heap, and try again next year. 
The Ugly: Lots of split veggies (see butternut photo, above), mean the watering system is not exactly working. I need to do more research, but from what I remember, splitting is the result of inconsistent watering, which makes sense, given the improvised nature of this first season’s irrigation. One more thing to learn from, which is what I love about gardening! (And all “mistakes” can be recycled on the compost pile.)
Another more mysterious “fail” — one of the hot pepper plants up and died pretty much overnight … it appears something might have severed the stem … maybe one of the critters digging holes throughout the garden. Oh well … one of the plants remains, and a few jalapenos go a long way …
The Fabulous: Our wonderful core of dedicated volunteers (from both campus and community) who have kept the garden watered, weeded, and harvested all summer. Thanks all!  The Good, the Bad, and the Buggy
Today’s visit to the Heritage Garden was rewarding as usual …
The Good:
The Big Max pumpkins continue to ripen (not getting much bigger, but definitely deepening in color)
The baby native plants—a generous donation from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy growing grounds—that we dug into the ground a month ago are doubling and tripling in size—even though we planted them at the “wrong” time of year: mid-summer. We planted them in a completely mustard-infested area, and are using mulch created from dead mustard stalks around some of the plants to keep the moisture in. (Other plants are mulched with local rock and/or shredded local trees from a recent campus tree-trimming.) The mulch is necessary because  … it’s mid-summer! And hot! Adding a layer of rocks/twigs to the soil surface really helps keep the soil surface temp lower (and also helps retain soil moisture). Win-win-win: mulch smothers weeds as well.
The watermelon are not numerous, but they are adorable—especially the stripey one (too bad I didn’t keep better records of what varieties were planted where).
There are LOTS of tomatoes. Yum.
The Bad: 
The green bean teepee has been completely co-opted by aphids. We tried to hand-squish them at the beginning (and this worked at our home garden, where we could take care of them every day), but the aphids won this round. Nothing to do but toss the plants on the compost heap, and try again next year. 
The Ugly: Lots of split veggies (see butternut photo, above), mean the watering system is not exactly working. I need to do more research, but from what I remember, splitting is the result of inconsistent watering, which makes sense, given the improvised nature of this first season’s irrigation. One more thing to learn from, which is what I love about gardening! (And all “mistakes” can be recycled on the compost pile.)
Another more mysterious “fail” — one of the hot pepper plants up and died pretty much overnight … it appears something might have severed the stem … maybe one of the critters digging holes throughout the garden. Oh well … one of the plants remains, and a few jalapenos go a long way …
The Fabulous: Our wonderful core of dedicated volunteers (from both campus and community) who have kept the garden watered, weeded, and harvested all summer. Thanks all!  The Good, the Bad, and the Buggy
Today’s visit to the Heritage Garden was rewarding as usual …
The Good:
The Big Max pumpkins continue to ripen (not getting much bigger, but definitely deepening in color)
The baby native plants—a generous donation from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy growing grounds—that we dug into the ground a month ago are doubling and tripling in size—even though we planted them at the “wrong” time of year: mid-summer. We planted them in a completely mustard-infested area, and are using mulch created from dead mustard stalks around some of the plants to keep the moisture in. (Other plants are mulched with local rock and/or shredded local trees from a recent campus tree-trimming.) The mulch is necessary because  … it’s mid-summer! And hot! Adding a layer of rocks/twigs to the soil surface really helps keep the soil surface temp lower (and also helps retain soil moisture). Win-win-win: mulch smothers weeds as well.
The watermelon are not numerous, but they are adorable—especially the stripey one (too bad I didn’t keep better records of what varieties were planted where).
There are LOTS of tomatoes. Yum.
The Bad: 
The green bean teepee has been completely co-opted by aphids. We tried to hand-squish them at the beginning (and this worked at our home garden, where we could take care of them every day), but the aphids won this round. Nothing to do but toss the plants on the compost heap, and try again next year. 
The Ugly: Lots of split veggies (see butternut photo, above), mean the watering system is not exactly working. I need to do more research, but from what I remember, splitting is the result of inconsistent watering, which makes sense, given the improvised nature of this first season’s irrigation. One more thing to learn from, which is what I love about gardening! (And all “mistakes” can be recycled on the compost pile.)
Another more mysterious “fail” — one of the hot pepper plants up and died pretty much overnight … it appears something might have severed the stem … maybe one of the critters digging holes throughout the garden. Oh well … one of the plants remains, and a few jalapenos go a long way …
The Fabulous: Our wonderful core of dedicated volunteers (from both campus and community) who have kept the garden watered, weeded, and harvested all summer. Thanks all!  The Good, the Bad, and the Buggy
Today’s visit to the Heritage Garden was rewarding as usual …
The Good:
The Big Max pumpkins continue to ripen (not getting much bigger, but definitely deepening in color)
The baby native plants—a generous donation from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy growing grounds—that we dug into the ground a month ago are doubling and tripling in size—even though we planted them at the “wrong” time of year: mid-summer. We planted them in a completely mustard-infested area, and are using mulch created from dead mustard stalks around some of the plants to keep the moisture in. (Other plants are mulched with local rock and/or shredded local trees from a recent campus tree-trimming.) The mulch is necessary because  … it’s mid-summer! And hot! Adding a layer of rocks/twigs to the soil surface really helps keep the soil surface temp lower (and also helps retain soil moisture). Win-win-win: mulch smothers weeds as well.
The watermelon are not numerous, but they are adorable—especially the stripey one (too bad I didn’t keep better records of what varieties were planted where).
There are LOTS of tomatoes. Yum.
The Bad: 
The green bean teepee has been completely co-opted by aphids. We tried to hand-squish them at the beginning (and this worked at our home garden, where we could take care of them every day), but the aphids won this round. Nothing to do but toss the plants on the compost heap, and try again next year. 
The Ugly: Lots of split veggies (see butternut photo, above), mean the watering system is not exactly working. I need to do more research, but from what I remember, splitting is the result of inconsistent watering, which makes sense, given the improvised nature of this first season’s irrigation. One more thing to learn from, which is what I love about gardening! (And all “mistakes” can be recycled on the compost pile.)
Another more mysterious “fail” — one of the hot pepper plants up and died pretty much overnight … it appears something might have severed the stem … maybe one of the critters digging holes throughout the garden. Oh well … one of the plants remains, and a few jalapenos go a long way …
The Fabulous: Our wonderful core of dedicated volunteers (from both campus and community) who have kept the garden watered, weeded, and harvested all summer. Thanks all!  The Good, the Bad, and the Buggy
Today’s visit to the Heritage Garden was rewarding as usual …
The Good:
The Big Max pumpkins continue to ripen (not getting much bigger, but definitely deepening in color)
The baby native plants—a generous donation from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy growing grounds—that we dug into the ground a month ago are doubling and tripling in size—even though we planted them at the “wrong” time of year: mid-summer. We planted them in a completely mustard-infested area, and are using mulch created from dead mustard stalks around some of the plants to keep the moisture in. (Other plants are mulched with local rock and/or shredded local trees from a recent campus tree-trimming.) The mulch is necessary because  … it’s mid-summer! And hot! Adding a layer of rocks/twigs to the soil surface really helps keep the soil surface temp lower (and also helps retain soil moisture). Win-win-win: mulch smothers weeds as well.
The watermelon are not numerous, but they are adorable—especially the stripey one (too bad I didn’t keep better records of what varieties were planted where).
There are LOTS of tomatoes. Yum.
The Bad: 
The green bean teepee has been completely co-opted by aphids. We tried to hand-squish them at the beginning (and this worked at our home garden, where we could take care of them every day), but the aphids won this round. Nothing to do but toss the plants on the compost heap, and try again next year. 
The Ugly: Lots of split veggies (see butternut photo, above), mean the watering system is not exactly working. I need to do more research, but from what I remember, splitting is the result of inconsistent watering, which makes sense, given the improvised nature of this first season’s irrigation. One more thing to learn from, which is what I love about gardening! (And all “mistakes” can be recycled on the compost pile.)
Another more mysterious “fail” — one of the hot pepper plants up and died pretty much overnight … it appears something might have severed the stem … maybe one of the critters digging holes throughout the garden. Oh well … one of the plants remains, and a few jalapenos go a long way …
The Fabulous: Our wonderful core of dedicated volunteers (from both campus and community) who have kept the garden watered, weeded, and harvested all summer. Thanks all!  The Good, the Bad, and the Buggy
Today’s visit to the Heritage Garden was rewarding as usual …
The Good:
The Big Max pumpkins continue to ripen (not getting much bigger, but definitely deepening in color)
The baby native plants—a generous donation from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy growing grounds—that we dug into the ground a month ago are doubling and tripling in size—even though we planted them at the “wrong” time of year: mid-summer. We planted them in a completely mustard-infested area, and are using mulch created from dead mustard stalks around some of the plants to keep the moisture in. (Other plants are mulched with local rock and/or shredded local trees from a recent campus tree-trimming.) The mulch is necessary because  … it’s mid-summer! And hot! Adding a layer of rocks/twigs to the soil surface really helps keep the soil surface temp lower (and also helps retain soil moisture). Win-win-win: mulch smothers weeds as well.
The watermelon are not numerous, but they are adorable—especially the stripey one (too bad I didn’t keep better records of what varieties were planted where).
There are LOTS of tomatoes. Yum.
The Bad: 
The green bean teepee has been completely co-opted by aphids. We tried to hand-squish them at the beginning (and this worked at our home garden, where we could take care of them every day), but the aphids won this round. Nothing to do but toss the plants on the compost heap, and try again next year. 
The Ugly: Lots of split veggies (see butternut photo, above), mean the watering system is not exactly working. I need to do more research, but from what I remember, splitting is the result of inconsistent watering, which makes sense, given the improvised nature of this first season’s irrigation. One more thing to learn from, which is what I love about gardening! (And all “mistakes” can be recycled on the compost pile.)
Another more mysterious “fail” — one of the hot pepper plants up and died pretty much overnight … it appears something might have severed the stem … maybe one of the critters digging holes throughout the garden. Oh well … one of the plants remains, and a few jalapenos go a long way …
The Fabulous: Our wonderful core of dedicated volunteers (from both campus and community) who have kept the garden watered, weeded, and harvested all summer. Thanks all!  The Good, the Bad, and the Buggy
Today’s visit to the Heritage Garden was rewarding as usual …
The Good:
The Big Max pumpkins continue to ripen (not getting much bigger, but definitely deepening in color)
The baby native plants—a generous donation from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy growing grounds—that we dug into the ground a month ago are doubling and tripling in size—even though we planted them at the “wrong” time of year: mid-summer. We planted them in a completely mustard-infested area, and are using mulch created from dead mustard stalks around some of the plants to keep the moisture in. (Other plants are mulched with local rock and/or shredded local trees from a recent campus tree-trimming.) The mulch is necessary because  … it’s mid-summer! And hot! Adding a layer of rocks/twigs to the soil surface really helps keep the soil surface temp lower (and also helps retain soil moisture). Win-win-win: mulch smothers weeds as well.
The watermelon are not numerous, but they are adorable—especially the stripey one (too bad I didn’t keep better records of what varieties were planted where).
There are LOTS of tomatoes. Yum.
The Bad: 
The green bean teepee has been completely co-opted by aphids. We tried to hand-squish them at the beginning (and this worked at our home garden, where we could take care of them every day), but the aphids won this round. Nothing to do but toss the plants on the compost heap, and try again next year. 
The Ugly: Lots of split veggies (see butternut photo, above), mean the watering system is not exactly working. I need to do more research, but from what I remember, splitting is the result of inconsistent watering, which makes sense, given the improvised nature of this first season’s irrigation. One more thing to learn from, which is what I love about gardening! (And all “mistakes” can be recycled on the compost pile.)
Another more mysterious “fail” — one of the hot pepper plants up and died pretty much overnight … it appears something might have severed the stem … maybe one of the critters digging holes throughout the garden. Oh well … one of the plants remains, and a few jalapenos go a long way …
The Fabulous: Our wonderful core of dedicated volunteers (from both campus and community) who have kept the garden watered, weeded, and harvested all summer. Thanks all!  The Good, the Bad, and the Buggy
Today’s visit to the Heritage Garden was rewarding as usual …
The Good:
The Big Max pumpkins continue to ripen (not getting much bigger, but definitely deepening in color)
The baby native plants—a generous donation from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy growing grounds—that we dug into the ground a month ago are doubling and tripling in size—even though we planted them at the “wrong” time of year: mid-summer. We planted them in a completely mustard-infested area, and are using mulch created from dead mustard stalks around some of the plants to keep the moisture in. (Other plants are mulched with local rock and/or shredded local trees from a recent campus tree-trimming.) The mulch is necessary because  … it’s mid-summer! And hot! Adding a layer of rocks/twigs to the soil surface really helps keep the soil surface temp lower (and also helps retain soil moisture). Win-win-win: mulch smothers weeds as well.
The watermelon are not numerous, but they are adorable—especially the stripey one (too bad I didn’t keep better records of what varieties were planted where).
There are LOTS of tomatoes. Yum.
The Bad: 
The green bean teepee has been completely co-opted by aphids. We tried to hand-squish them at the beginning (and this worked at our home garden, where we could take care of them every day), but the aphids won this round. Nothing to do but toss the plants on the compost heap, and try again next year. 
The Ugly: Lots of split veggies (see butternut photo, above), mean the watering system is not exactly working. I need to do more research, but from what I remember, splitting is the result of inconsistent watering, which makes sense, given the improvised nature of this first season’s irrigation. One more thing to learn from, which is what I love about gardening! (And all “mistakes” can be recycled on the compost pile.)
Another more mysterious “fail” — one of the hot pepper plants up and died pretty much overnight … it appears something might have severed the stem … maybe one of the critters digging holes throughout the garden. Oh well … one of the plants remains, and a few jalapenos go a long way …
The Fabulous: Our wonderful core of dedicated volunteers (from both campus and community) who have kept the garden watered, weeded, and harvested all summer. Thanks all!  The Good, the Bad, and the Buggy
Today’s visit to the Heritage Garden was rewarding as usual …
The Good:
The Big Max pumpkins continue to ripen (not getting much bigger, but definitely deepening in color)
The baby native plants—a generous donation from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy growing grounds—that we dug into the ground a month ago are doubling and tripling in size—even though we planted them at the “wrong” time of year: mid-summer. We planted them in a completely mustard-infested area, and are using mulch created from dead mustard stalks around some of the plants to keep the moisture in. (Other plants are mulched with local rock and/or shredded local trees from a recent campus tree-trimming.) The mulch is necessary because  … it’s mid-summer! And hot! Adding a layer of rocks/twigs to the soil surface really helps keep the soil surface temp lower (and also helps retain soil moisture). Win-win-win: mulch smothers weeds as well.
The watermelon are not numerous, but they are adorable—especially the stripey one (too bad I didn’t keep better records of what varieties were planted where).
There are LOTS of tomatoes. Yum.
The Bad: 
The green bean teepee has been completely co-opted by aphids. We tried to hand-squish them at the beginning (and this worked at our home garden, where we could take care of them every day), but the aphids won this round. Nothing to do but toss the plants on the compost heap, and try again next year. 
The Ugly: Lots of split veggies (see butternut photo, above), mean the watering system is not exactly working. I need to do more research, but from what I remember, splitting is the result of inconsistent watering, which makes sense, given the improvised nature of this first season’s irrigation. One more thing to learn from, which is what I love about gardening! (And all “mistakes” can be recycled on the compost pile.)
Another more mysterious “fail” — one of the hot pepper plants up and died pretty much overnight … it appears something might have severed the stem … maybe one of the critters digging holes throughout the garden. Oh well … one of the plants remains, and a few jalapenos go a long way …
The Fabulous: Our wonderful core of dedicated volunteers (from both campus and community) who have kept the garden watered, weeded, and harvested all summer. Thanks all! 

The Good, the Bad, and the Buggy

Today’s visit to the Heritage Garden was rewarding as usual …

The Good:

The Big Max pumpkins continue to ripen (not getting much bigger, but definitely deepening in color)

The baby native plants—a generous donation from the Irvine Ranch Conservancy growing grounds—that we dug into the ground a month ago are doubling and tripling in size—even though we planted them at the “wrong” time of year: mid-summer. We planted them in a completely mustard-infested area, and are using mulch created from dead mustard stalks around some of the plants to keep the moisture in. (Other plants are mulched with local rock and/or shredded local trees from a recent campus tree-trimming.) The mulch is necessary because  … it’s mid-summer! And hot! Adding a layer of rocks/twigs to the soil surface really helps keep the soil surface temp lower (and also helps retain soil moisture). Win-win-win: mulch smothers weeds as well.

The watermelon are not numerous, but they are adorable—especially the stripey one (too bad I didn’t keep better records of what varieties were planted where).

There are LOTS of tomatoes. Yum.

The Bad: 

The green bean teepee has been completely co-opted by aphids. We tried to hand-squish them at the beginning (and this worked at our home garden, where we could take care of them every day), but the aphids won this round. Nothing to do but toss the plants on the compost heap, and try again next year. 

The Ugly: Lots of split veggies (see butternut photo, above), mean the watering system is not exactly working. I need to do more research, but from what I remember, splitting is the result of inconsistent watering, which makes sense, given the improvised nature of this first season’s irrigation. One more thing to learn from, which is what I love about gardening! (And all “mistakes” can be recycled on the compost pile.)

Another more mysterious “fail” — one of the hot pepper plants up and died pretty much overnight … it appears something might have severed the stem … maybe one of the critters digging holes throughout the garden. Oh well … one of the plants remains, and a few jalapenos go a long way …

The Fabulous: Our wonderful core of dedicated volunteers (from both campus and community) who have kept the garden watered, weeded, and harvested all summer. Thanks all! 

Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours! Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 
We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 
Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).
May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours!

Another warm-but-rewarding summer Sunday afternoon in the Heritage Garden … we removed spent plants, transplanted baby green bean seedlings, planted six new tiny heirloom tomato plants, pruned and plucked and mulched and watered … and then … harvested! 

We collected: lots of ‘San Diego’ and yellow pear tomatoes, yellow squash, a few zucchini, a bit of Swiss chard, bushels of basil, and jalapenos a-plenty. 

Thanks, volunteers, for your sweat and effort; the Heritage Garden is thriving, and it’s only because of all the dedicated folks who visit on both weekdays and weekends to lend a hand (and keep things watered!).

May showers of summer harvest blessing be yours!

Last week we had a donation of 80 native plants … locally grown from Orange County seed, courtesy of the Irvine Ranch Conservancy. Thanks to a dedicated bunch of volunteers (including my grandsons), we got all the plants in the ground Sunday afternoon. Although this is not the optimal time to plant natives, we’re glad to have this chance to experiment, and look forward to following the progress of the seedlings (some of which were planted in cleared ground, and some of which were stuck in the midst of a thick layer of invasive black mustard stalks).

One of our volunteers was an old family friend (and professional photographer), visiting Orange County for a bit. She graciously put together our first Heritage Garden video …  Thank you, Sarah Porisch Crowder!